Does Micro-CT scanning damage DNA in museum specimens?

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10141/612488
Title:
Does Micro-CT scanning damage DNA in museum specimens?
Authors:
Hall, A; Sherlock, E; Sykes, D
Abstract:
X-ray micro-computed tomography and DNA sequencing are useful and increasingly common tools in taxonomy and collections research. Whilst the benefits of each method are continually evaluated and debated individually, how the methods impact each other requires more attention. We compared DNA fragment length and the barcode sequence CO1 in samples throughout a CT-scanning protocol, for a range of X-ray exposures and energies. We found no evidence of DNA damage, but advise caution when using precious or archival material, highlighting the need for further investigations and considering potential areas for research.
Citation:
Does Micro-CT scanning damage DNA in museum specimens? Hall, A., Sherlock, E., Sykes, D. Journal of Natural Science Collections, Volume 2, pages 22 - 29
Publisher:
Natural Science Collections Association
Journal:
Journal of Natural Science Collections
Issue date:
2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10141/612488
Additional Links:
http://www.natsca.org/article/2075; http://www.natsca.org/sites/default/files/publications/JoNSC%20Vol2-3.PDF
Submitted date:
2016-04-25
Type:
Journal Article
Item Description:
NatSCA supports open access publication as part of its mission is to promote and support natural science collections. NatSCA uses the Creative Commons Attribution License (CCAL) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.5/ for all works we publish. Under CCAL authors retain ownership of the copyright for their article, but authors allow anyone to download, reuse, reprint, modify, distribute, and/or copy articles in NatSCA publications, so long as the original authors and source are cited. The attached file is the published version of the article.
Subject Terms:
Micro-computed tomography; X-ray microtomography; DNA fragmentation; PCR; Sanger sequencing; Barcoding; Lumbricus terrestris; Oligochaeta
Appears in Collections:
Life sciences; Core research labs and consulting

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHall, Aen
dc.contributor.authorSherlock, Een
dc.contributor.authorSykes, Den
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-10T10:06:42Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-10T10:06:42Z-
dc.date.issued2015en_US
dc.date.submitted2016-04-25-
dc.identifier.citationDoes Micro-CT scanning damage DNA in museum specimens? Hall, A., Sherlock, E., Sykes, D. Journal of Natural Science Collections, Volume 2, pages 22 - 29en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10141/612488-
dc.description.abstractX-ray micro-computed tomography and DNA sequencing are useful and increasingly common tools in taxonomy and collections research. Whilst the benefits of each method are continually evaluated and debated individually, how the methods impact each other requires more attention. We compared DNA fragment length and the barcode sequence CO1 in samples throughout a CT-scanning protocol, for a range of X-ray exposures and energies. We found no evidence of DNA damage, but advise caution when using precious or archival material, highlighting the need for further investigations and considering potential areas for research.en_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.publisherNatural Science Collections Associationen_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.natsca.org/article/2075en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.natsca.org/sites/default/files/publications/JoNSC%20Vol2-3.PDFen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.titleDoes Micro-CT scanning damage DNA in museum specimens?en_US
dc.typeJournal Article-
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Natural Science Collectionsen_US
dc.conference.locationUKen_US
dc.identifier.volume2en_US
dc.identifier.startpage22 - 28en_US
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum-
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group-
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group/Core Research Laboratories-
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group/Core Research Laboratories/Imaging and Analysis Centre (IAC)-
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group/Core Research Laboratories/Molecular Biology Laboratories-
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group/Functional groups-
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group/Functional groups/Collections-
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group/Functional groups/Collections/LS Collections-
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group/Functional groups/Facilities Support-
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group/Life Sciences-
dc.embargoNot knownen_US
elements.import.authorHall, Aen_US
elements.import.authorSherlock, Een_US
elements.import.authorSykes, Den_US
dc.description.nhmNatSCA supports open access publication as part of its mission is to promote and support natural science collections. NatSCA uses the Creative Commons Attribution License (CCAL) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.5/ for all works we publish. Under CCAL authors retain ownership of the copyright for their article, but authors allow anyone to download, reuse, reprint, modify, distribute, and/or copy articles in NatSCA publications, so long as the original authors and source are cited. The attached file is the published version of the article.-
dc.subject.nhmMicro-computed tomography; X-ray microtomography; DNA fragmentation; PCR; Sanger sequencing; Barcoding; Lumbricus terrestris; Oligochaeta-
This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons
All Items in The Natural History Museum repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.