Putting insects on the map: near-global variation in sphingid moth richness along spatial and environmental gradients

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10141/622216
Title:
Putting insects on the map: near-global variation in sphingid moth richness along spatial and environmental gradients
Authors:
Ballesteros-Mejia, L; Kitching, IJ ( 0000-0003-4738-5967 ) ; Jetz, W; Beck, J
Abstract:
Despite their vast diversity and vital ecological role, insects are notoriously underrepresented in biogeography and conservation, and key broad-scale ecological hypotheses about them remain untested – largely due to generally incomplete and very coarse spatial distribution knowledge. Integrating records from publications, field work and natural history collections, we used a mixture of species distribution models and expert estimates to provide geographic distributions and emergent richness patterns for all ca 1000 sphingid moth species found outside the Americas in high spatial detail. Total sphingid moth richness, the first for a higher insect group to be documented at this scale, shows distinct maxima in the wet tropics of Africa and the Oriental with notable decay toward Australasia. Using multivariate models controlling for spatial autocorrelation, we found that primary productivity is the dominant environmental variable associated with moth richness, while temperature, contrary to our predictions, is an unexpectedly weak predictor. This is in stark contrast to the importance we identify for temperature as a niche variable of individual species. Despite divergent life histories, both main sub-groups of moths exhibit these relationships. Tribal-level deconstruction of richness and climatic niche patterns indicate idiosyncratic effects of biogeographic history for some of the less species-rich tribes, which in some cases exhibit distinct richness peaks away from the tropics. The study confirms, for a diverse insect group, overall richness associations of remarkable similarity to those documented for vertebrates and highlights the significant within-taxon structure that underpins emergent macroecological patterns. Results do not, however, meet predictions from vertebrate-derived hypotheses on how thermoregulation affects the strength of temperature–richness effects. Our study thus broadens the taxonomic focus in this data-deficient discourse. Our procedures of processing incomplete, scattered distribution data are a template for application to other taxa and regions.
Citation:
Provider: John Wiley & Sons, Ltd Content:text/plain; charset="UTF-8" TY - JOUR AU - Ballesteros-Mejia, Liliana AU - Kitching, Ian J. AU - Jetz, Walter AU - Beck, Jan TI - Putting insects on the map: near-global variation in sphingid moth richness along spatial and environmental gradients JO - Ecography JA - Ecography VL - 40 IS - 6 PB - Blackwell Publishing Ltd SN - 1600-0587 UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ecog.02438 DO - 10.1111/ecog.02438 SP - 698 EP - 708 PY - 2017 ER -
Publisher:
Wiley
Journal:
Ecography
Issue date:
27-Jun-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10141/622216
DOI:
10.1111/ecog.02438
Submitted date:
2017-02-23
Type:
Journal Article
Item Description:
The file attached is the submitted/pre-refereeing version version of the article.
ISSN:
0906-7590
Appears in Collections:
Life sciences

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBallesteros-Mejia, Len
dc.contributor.authorKitching, IJen
dc.contributor.authorJetz, Wen
dc.contributor.authorBeck, Jen
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-13T16:27:41Z-
dc.date.available2017-06-13T16:27:41Z-
dc.date.issued2016-06-27-
dc.date.submitted2017-02-23-
dc.identifier.citationProvider: John Wiley & Sons, Ltd Content:text/plain; charset="UTF-8" TY - JOUR AU - Ballesteros-Mejia, Liliana AU - Kitching, Ian J. AU - Jetz, Walter AU - Beck, Jan TI - Putting insects on the map: near-global variation in sphingid moth richness along spatial and environmental gradients JO - Ecography JA - Ecography VL - 40 IS - 6 PB - Blackwell Publishing Ltd SN - 1600-0587 UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ecog.02438 DO - 10.1111/ecog.02438 SP - 698 EP - 708 PY - 2017 ER -en
dc.identifier.issn0906-7590-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/ecog.02438-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10141/622216-
dc.description.abstractDespite their vast diversity and vital ecological role, insects are notoriously underrepresented in biogeography and conservation, and key broad-scale ecological hypotheses about them remain untested – largely due to generally incomplete and very coarse spatial distribution knowledge. Integrating records from publications, field work and natural history collections, we used a mixture of species distribution models and expert estimates to provide geographic distributions and emergent richness patterns for all ca 1000 sphingid moth species found outside the Americas in high spatial detail. Total sphingid moth richness, the first for a higher insect group to be documented at this scale, shows distinct maxima in the wet tropics of Africa and the Oriental with notable decay toward Australasia. Using multivariate models controlling for spatial autocorrelation, we found that primary productivity is the dominant environmental variable associated with moth richness, while temperature, contrary to our predictions, is an unexpectedly weak predictor. This is in stark contrast to the importance we identify for temperature as a niche variable of individual species. Despite divergent life histories, both main sub-groups of moths exhibit these relationships. Tribal-level deconstruction of richness and climatic niche patterns indicate idiosyncratic effects of biogeographic history for some of the less species-rich tribes, which in some cases exhibit distinct richness peaks away from the tropics. The study confirms, for a diverse insect group, overall richness associations of remarkable similarity to those documented for vertebrates and highlights the significant within-taxon structure that underpins emergent macroecological patterns. Results do not, however, meet predictions from vertebrate-derived hypotheses on how thermoregulation affects the strength of temperature–richness effects. Our study thus broadens the taxonomic focus in this data-deficient discourse. Our procedures of processing incomplete, scattered distribution data are a template for application to other taxa and regions.en
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.rightsopenAccessen
dc.titlePutting insects on the map: near-global variation in sphingid moth richness along spatial and environmental gradients-
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.identifier.journalEcographyen
dc.identifier.volume40en
dc.identifier.issue6en
dc.identifier.startpage698en
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum-
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group-
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group/Functional groups-
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group/Functional groups/Research-
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group/Functional groups/Research/LS Research-
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group/Life Sciences-
dc.embargoNot knownen_US
elements.import.authorBallesteros-Mejia, Len_US
elements.import.authorKitching, IJen_US
elements.import.authorJetz, Wen_US
elements.import.authorBeck, Jen_US
dc.description.nhmThe file attached is the submitted/pre-refereeing version version of the article.en
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