• Biological archives reveal contrasting patterns in trace element concentrations in pelagic seabird feathers over more than a century

      Bond, AL; Lavers, JL (Elsevier, 2020-08-01)
      Contamination of diverse environments and wild species by some contaminants is projected to continue and increase in coming decades. In the marine environment, large volumes of data to assess how concentrations have changed over time can be gathered from indicator species such as seabirds, including through sampling feathers from archival collections and museums. As apex predators, Flesh-footed Shearwaters (Ardenna carneipes) are subject to high concentrations of bioaccumulative and biomagnifying contaminants, and reflect the health of their local marine environment. We analysed Flesh-footed Shearwater feathers from Australia from museum specimens and live birds collected between 1900 and 2011 and assessed temporal trends in three trace elements of toxicological concern: cadmium, mercury, and lead. Concentrations of cadmium increased by 1.5% per year (95% CI: +0.6, +3.0), while mercury was unchanged through the time series (−0.3% per year; 05% CI: -2.1, +1.5), and lead decreased markedly (−2.1% per year, 95% CI: -3.2, −1.0). A reduction in birds’ trophic position through the 20th century, and decreased atmospheric emissions were the likely driving factors for mercury and lead, respectively. By combining archival material from museum specimens with contemporary samples, we have been able to further elucidate the potential threats posed to these apex predators by metal contamination.
    • Changes in technology and imperfect detection of nest contents impedes reliable estimates of population trends in burrowing seabirds

      Lavers, JL; Hutton, I; Bond, A (Elsevier, 2019-03-01)
      One of the most fundamental aspects of conservation biology is understanding trends in the abundance of species and populations. This influences conservation interventions, threat abatement, and management by implicitly or explicitly setting targets for favourable conservation states, such as an increasing or stable population. Burrow-nesting seabirds present many challenges for determining abundance reliably, which is further hampered by variability in the quality of previous surveys. We used burrow scopes to determine the population status of Flesh-footed Shearwaters (Ardenna carneipes) at their largest colony on Lord Howe Island, Australia, in 2018. We estimated a breeding population of 22,654 breeding pairs (95% CI: 8159–37,909). Comparing burrow scope models used in 2018 found more than half of burrow contents (20/36 burrows examined) were classified differently. If this detection probability is applied retroactively to surveys in 2002 and 2009, we estimate that the Flesh-footed Shearwater population on Lord Howe has decreased by up to 50% in the last decade, but uncertainty around previous surveys’ ability to reliably determine burrow contents means a direct comparison is not possible. The decline in burrow density between 2018 and previous years adds further evidence that the population may not be stable. Our results highlight a need for regular surveys to quantify detection probability so that as video technology advances, previous population estimates remain comparable. We urge caution when comparing population counts of burrowing seabirds using different technologies, to ensure comparisons are meaningful.
    • Cladistics

      Kitching, I; Forey, PL; Williams, DM (Elsevier, 2017-01-01)
      Cladistics is a class of methods of biological classification that groups taxa hierarchically into discrete sets and subsets. This article presents the principles and concepts of cladistics and describes the principal analytical methods. The operations by which observations of organisms are coded for analysis are explained, followed by the methods for reconstructing the hierarchical relationships among taxa (usually expressed as branching diagrams termed cladograms). Statistics and principles for determining the degree of fit between data and cladograms are discussed, which permit choices to be made among competing cladograms.
    • Deep-Sea Misconceptions Cause Underestimation of Seabed-Mining Impacts

      Smith, CR; Tunnicliffe, V; Colaço, A; Drazen, JC; Gollner, S; Levin, LA; Mestre, NC; Metaxas, A; Molodtsova, TN; Morato, T; et al. (Elsevier, 2020-07-31)
      Scientific misconceptions are likely leading to miscalculations of the environmental impacts of deepseabed mining. These result from underestimating mining footprints relative to habitats targeted and poor understanding of the sensitivity, biodiversity, and dynamics of deep-sea ecosystems. Addressing these misconceptions and knowledge gaps is needed for effective management of deep-seabed mining.
    • Detection of ultrafine plastics ingested by seabirds using tissue digestion.

      Lavers, JL; Stivaktakis, G; Hutton, I; Bond, AL (Elsevier, 2019-04-06)
      Plastic debris is a major global threat to marine ecosystems and species. However, our knowledge of this issue may be incomplete due to a lack of a standardized method for quantifying ingested ultrafine particles (1 μm - 1 mm) in wildlife. This study provides the first quantification of ultrafine plastic in seabirds using chemical and biological digestion treatments to extract plastic items from seabird gizzards. The alkaline agent, potassium hydroxide, outperformed the enzyme corolase, based on cost and efficiency (e.g., digestion time). Ultrafine plastics were observed in 7.0% of Flesh-footed Shearwater (Ardenna carneipes) gizzards collected from Lord Howe Island, Australia and accounted for 3.6% of all plastic items recovered (13 out of 359 items). Existing methods for extracting ingested plastic from seabirds do not account for ultrafine particles, therefore our results indicate current seabird plastic loads, and the associated physical and biological impacts, are underestimated.
    • Early colonisation of urban indoor carcasses by blow flies (Diptera: Calliphoridae): An experimental study from central Spain

      Martin-Vega, D; Martín Nieto, C; Cifrián, B; Baz, A; Díaz-Aranda, LM (Elsevier, 2017-09-01)
      Due to their ubiquity and synanthropy, blow flies (Diptera: Calliphoridae) are generally the first colonisers of cadavers and, therefore, frequently used to estimate a minimum post-mortem interval (minPMI). Whereas in outdoor situations blow flies are expected to locate and colonise exposed cadavers within hours or even minutes after death, it is usually assumed that the colonisation of a cadaver indoors might be delayed for an uncertain period of time. This uncertainty severely limits the informativity of minPMI estimates based on entomological evidence. Moreover, these limitations are emphasised by the lack of experimental data on insect colonisation of indoor carrion and by the fact that most of the forensic cases involving entomological evidence have been reported to occur indoors. In this study we investigate the early colonisation of pig carcasses placed indoors in a building located in the centre of an urban environment in central Spain. Three carcasses were placed in three equal rooms with a window half opened during five experimental trials: summer 2013, autumn 2013, winter 2014, spring 2014 and summer 2014. The species composition and their contribution to the carrion colonisation differed among seasons. Calliphora vicina Robineau–Desvoidy was the sole coloniser of carcasses in winter and colonised the carcasses within the first 24–48 h in every season, although Lucilia sericata (Meigen) was the first coloniser of most summer carcasses. On the other hand, Calliphora vomitoria (L.) and Chrysomya albiceps (Wiedemann) colonised the carcasses significantly later in spring and in spring and summer, respectively, with a delay of several days. In autumn, however, there were no significant differences in the colonisation times by C. vicina, L. sericata and Ch. albiceps. C. vicina and L. sericata showed a clear preference for ovipositing in the natural orifices of the carcasses, whereas Ch. albiceps oviposited more frequently on the trunk and legs.
    • The effect of titanite crystallisation on Eu and Ce anomalies in zircon and its implications for the assessment of porphyry Cu deposit fertility

      Loader, ML; Wilkinson, J; Armstrong, R (Elsevier, 2017-05-31)
      The redox sensitivity of Ce and Eu anomalies in zircon has been clearly demonstrated by experimental studies, and these may represent an important tool in the exploration for porphyry Cu deposits which are thought to be derived from oxidised magmas. These deposits are significant because they are the source of much of the world's copper and almost all of the molybdenum and rhenium, key elements in many modern technologies. However, Ce and Eu anomalies in zircon are also affected by the co-crystallisation of REE bearing phases, such as titanite. Here, we report the trace element chemistry of zircons from titanite-bearing intrusions associated with mineralisation at the world class Oyu Tolgoi porphyry Cu–Au deposit (Mongolia). Based on these data, we suggest that neither zircon Eu/Eu⁎, nor Ce4+/Ce3+ are robust proxies for melt redox conditions, because they are both too strongly dependent on melt REE concentrations, which are usually poorly constrained and controlled by the crystallisation of titanite and other REE-bearing phases. In spite of this, Eu/Eu⁎ can broadly distinguish between fertile and barren systems, so may still be an indicator of porphyry magma fertility, and a useful tool for exploration.
    • Evolution of reproductive strategies in the species-rich land snail subfamily Phaedusinae (Stylommatophora: Clausiliidae)

      Mamos, Tomasz; Uit de Weerd, Dennis; von Oheimb, Parm Viktor; Sulikowska-Drozd, Anna (Elsevier, 2020-12-28)
      Most of the present knowledge on animal reproductive mode evolution, and possible factors driving transitions between oviparity and viviparity is based on studies on vertebrates. The species rich door snail (Clausiliidae) subfamily Phaedusinae represents a suitable and unique model for further examining parity evolution, as three different strategies, oviparity, viviparity, and the intermediate mode of embryo-retention, occur in this group. The present study reconstructs the evolution of reproductive strategies in Phaedusinae based on time-calibrated molecular phylogenetics, reproductive mode examinations and ancestral state reconstruction. Our phylogenetic analysis employing multiple mitochondrial and nuclear markers identified a well-supported clade (including the tribes Phaedusini and Serrulinini) that contains species exhibiting various reproductive strategies. This clade evolved from an oviparous most recent common ancestor according to our reconstruction. All non-oviparous taxa are confined to a highly supported subclade, coinciding with the tribe Phaedusini. Both oviparity and viviparity occur frequently in different lineages of this subclade that are not closely related. During Phaedusini diversification, multiple transitions in reproductive strategy must have taken place, which could have been promoted by a high fitness of embryo-retaining species. The evolutionary success of this group might result from the maintenance of various strategies.
    • Glacial and gully erosion on Mars: A terrestrial perspective

      Conway, SJ; Butcher, FE; de Haas, T; Deijns, AA; M. Grindrod, P; Davis, JM (Elsevier, 2018-05-24)
      The mid- to high latitudes of Mars host assemblages of landforms consistent with a receding glacial landscape on Earth. These landforms are postulated to have formed >5 Ma under a different climate regime when Mars' orbital obliquity was on average 10° higher than today. Here, we investigate the spatiotemporal relationship between gullies and glacial landforms, both common in the mid-latitudes. Gullies are kilometre-scale landforms with a source alcove, transportation channel, and depositional apron. The glacial landforms comprise (1) extant viscous flow features (VFF) that extend from the base of crater walls into the interior of crater floors and are widely interpreted as debris-covered glaciers containing extant ice, and (2) landforms such as arcuate ridges at the base of crater walls that have been interpreted as relicts of more recent, less extensive glacial advances focussed on crater walls. We measure headwall retreat associated with glacial landforms and date their host-craters to constrain minimum headwall retreat rates. We record headwall retreat rates up to ~102 m My−1 for the youngest suite of glacial landforms, equivalent to erosion rates of wet-based glaciers on Earth and to headwall retreat rates associated with martian bedrock gully systems. We find extensive evidence for a single erosional episode dating 5–10 Ma, which postdates emplacement of the majority of VFF but seems to predate formation of the gullies. We propose that the wet-based glacial episode was associated with glaciation focussed on the crater walls rather than melting of the glacial ice deposits on the crater floors (VFF). This is consistent with our observations of crater wall morphologies, including the presence of arcuate ridges consistent with terrestrial glaciotectonic features that require liquid water to form, textural alteration of the eroded bedrock surface consistent with ice-segregation and frost-shattering, and the presence of downslope pasted-on terrain, tentatively interpreted here as glacial till deposits sourced from glacial erosion of the crater wall. The pasted-on terrain is usually interpreted as a thicker, latitude-dependant mantle located on sloping terrain formed from airfall of ice nucleated on dust, but we suggest that it has been reworked by glaciation and is predominantly glacial in origin. Although our results cannot substantiate that gullies are produced by meltwater, the discovery of this wet glacial event does provide evidence for widespread meltwater generation in Mars' recent history.
    • A global assessment of Zn isotope fractionation in secondary Zn minerals from sulfide and non-sulfide ore deposits and model for fractionation control

      Mondillo, N; Wilkinson, JJ; Boni, M; Weiss, DJ; Mathur, R (Elsevier, 2018-11-15)
      We investigated extent and direction of Zn isotope fractionation in secondary zinc minerals formed during low temperature hydrothermal and/or supergene oxidation of primary sulfide deposits. Zinc isotope data have been obtained from non-sulfide zinc mineral separates (willemite - Zn2SiO4, smithsonite - ZnCO3, hemimorphite - Zn4(Si2O7)(OH)2·H2O, hydrozincite - Zn5(CO3)2(OH)6, and sauconite - Na0.3Zn3(Si,Al)4O10(OH)2·4H2O) collected from several Zn deposits in Ireland, Belgium, Poland, Namibia, Peru, Yemen and Zambia. The data are compared with Zn isotope compositions measured on Zn sulfides collected in the same areas and/or derived from the existing literature, to establish the controls of direction and likely extent of any fractionations. We find that willemite has the greatest compositional variability, with measured δ66ZnJCM-Lyon values ranging from −0.42 to 1.39‰, spanning the entire range of terrestrial variation in Zn isotopes recorded to date. Overall, significant fractionations in positive and negative directions are recorded relative to the precursor phase (primary sphalerite or an earlier secondary phase), with primary sphalerite falling in a relatively narrow range of isotopic values (approximately −0.1 to +0.4‰). Most of the data observed on willemite, hemimorphite and hydrozincite can be explained with a model of isotopic fractionation, in which partial dissolution of primary sphalerite is followed by precipitation of an initial secondary phase that preferentially incorporates heavy Zn isotopes. Smithsonite, instead, preferentially incorporates light Zn isotopes. This reflects the variation in the Zn-x bond strengths of these secondary phases with respect to the original sulfides. We also observed that isotope compositions do not depend only on the difference between the fractionation factors of the involved phases but also on the amount of the secondary mineral precipitated after dissolution of primary sulfide, and that the greatest fractionations occur when only small amounts of secondary mineral are precipitated. Progressive precipitation from migrating fluids that form phases enriched in heavy zinc isotopes would lead to a gradual decrease in the δ66Zn values of such phases, and the fluids involved, in time and space. Strong negative isotopic shifts are almost only observed for late crystallizing phases, such as those in vugs. These are interpreted to reflect precipitation from residual, isotopically-light fluids that are the inevitable highly-fractionated product of the above-described process. Where a more complete replacement of primary sulfide has occurred, such as in the high-grade core of non-sulfide zinc orebodies, there is limited net isotopic fractionation because dissolved primary zinc is nearly quantitatively reprecipitated locally. In addition, in only one case (Yanque, Peru) we observed that the fringes of non-sulfide zinc deposit were characterized by isotopically fractionated compositions, with highly negative values implying extensive precipitation (earlier, or elsewhere) of isotopically heavy secondary phases. The higher-grade ore zones, where complete breakdown of primary sulfides and quantitative reprecipitation of zinc have occurred, show instead less fractionated compositions.
    • A Horizon Scan of research priorities to inform policies aimed at reducing the harm of plastic pollution to biota

      Provencher, JF; Liboiron, M; Borrelle, SB; Bond, AL; Rochman, C; Lavers, JL; Avery-Gomm, S; Yamashita, R; Ryan, PG; Lusher, AL; et al. (Elsevier, 2020-09-01)
      Plastic pollution in the oceans is a priority environmental issue. The recent increase in research on the topic, coupled with growing public awareness, has catalyzed policymakers around the world to identify and implement solutions that minimize the harm caused by plastic pollution. To aid and coordinate these efforts, we surveyed experts with scientific experience identified through their peer-reviewed publications. We asked experts about the most pressing research questions relating to how biota interact with plastic pollution that in turn can inform policy decisions and research agendas to best contribute to understanding and reducing the harm of plastic pollution to biota. We used a modified Horizon Scan method that first used a subgroup of experts to generate 46 research questions on aquatic biota and plastics, and then conducted an online survey of researchers globally to prioritize questions in terms of their importance to inform policy development. One hundred and fifteen experts from 29 countries ranked research questions in six themes. The questions were ranked by urgency, indicating which research should be addressed immediately, which can be addressed later, and which are of limited relevance to inform action on plastics as an environmental pollutant. We found that questions relating to the following four themes were the most commonly top-ranked research priorities: (i) sources, circulation and distribution of plastics, (ii) type of harm from plastics, (iii) detection of ingested plastics and the associated problems, and (iv) related economies and policy to ingested plastics. While there are many research questions on the topic of impacts of plastic pollution on biota that could be funded and investigated, our results focus collective priorities in terms of research that experts believe will inform effective policy and on-the-ground conservation.
    • Impact of sample degradation and inhibition on field-based DNA identification of human remains

      Dawnay, N; Flamson, R; Hall, MJR; Steadman, DW (Elsevier, 2018-07-25)
      The advent of DNA technologies for field-based application promises to provide rapid intelligence to aid investigations. Their validation and adoption by enforcement groups have demonstrated utility in sample screening and prioritisation, but field application in some areas of forensic science, such as human remains identification, is little evidenced. Assessing the ability of such approaches to provide meaningful data is critical as decomposition is likely to complicate analysis and limit the effective use of such field-based DNA interventions. This research assessed the ability to collect viable DNA data in the field using the ParaDNA Field Instrument and Intelligence Test chemistry. Different sample collection methods were assessed; direct from skin surface; direct from exposed tissue; indirect from muscle swab transferred to FTA card; and from larvae on the donors. Samples were collected and processed on-site at the Anthropology Research Facility, University of Tennessee. The data show that the muscle tissue provided the most effective sample template and, using this approach, it was possible to generate STR profiles from human remains in under two hours from the time of sample collection. STR profile data were collected up to four days from donor placement (114 Accumulated Degree Days). After this time there was a rapid decrease in the quality of the profiles collected due to the onset of decomposition. The data also show that effective sample recovery was not possible from the surface of the skin, exposed tissue or from carrion larvae. Inhibition studies in the laboratory suggest that by-products of the decomposition process are the primary mode of failure. Together these data suggests a possible application for screening and prioritisation in criminal casework but highlights issues that may affect the success of the approach.
    • The influence of fractionation of REE-enriched minerals on the zircon partition coefficients

      Zhong, Shihua; Li, Sanzhong; Seltmann, Reimar; Lai, Zhiqing; Zhou, Jie (Elsevier, 2020-11-05)
      Zircon is widely used to simulate melt generation, migration and evolution within the crust and mantle. The achievable performance of melt modelling generally depends on the availability of reliable trace element partition coefficients (D). However, a large range of DREE values for zircon from natural samples and experimental studies has been reported, with values spanning up to 3 orders of magnitude. Unfortunately, a gap of knowledge on this variability is evident. In this study we model the crystallization processes of common REE-bearing minerals from granitic melts and show that the measured zircon DREE would be elevated if there is crystallization of REE-enriched minerals subsequent to zircon. Nevertheless, compared to zircon DREE values measured from experimental studies, this mechanism appears to have a less significant influence on those from natural granite samples since the quantity of crystallized REE-enriched minerals is very low in natural magmatic systems and/or most of them crystallize prior to zircon. Combined with recently published studies, this work supports that analysis of natural zircon/host groundmass pairs provides more robust DREE values applicable to natural systems than those measured from experimental studies, which can be used to constrain the provenance of detrital zircons.
    • Ingested plastic and trace element concentrations in Short-tailed Shearwaters (Ardenna tenuirostris)

      Puskic, PS; Lavers, JL; Adams, LR; Bond, AL (Elsevier, 2020-06-01)
      Pollution of marine environments is concerning for complex trophic systems. Two anthropogenic stresses associated with marine pollution are the introduction of marine plastic and their associated chemicals (e.g., trace elements) which, when ingested, may cause harm to wildlife. Here we explore the relationship between plastic ingestion and trace element burden in the breast muscle of Short-tailed Shearwaters (Ardenna tenuirostris). We found no relationship between the amount of plastic ingested and trace element concentration in the birds' tissues. Though the mass and number of plastic items ingested by birds during 1969–2017 did not change significantly, trace element concentrations of some elements (Cu, Zn, As, Rb, Sr and Cd), appeared to have increased in birds sampled in 2017 compared to limited data from prior studies. We encourage policy which considers the data gleaned from this sentinel species to monitor the anthropogenic alteration of the marine environment.
    • Probing recalcitrant problems in polyclad evolution and systematics with novel mitochondrial genome resources

      Kenny, NJ; Noreña, C; Damborenea, C; Grande, C (Elsevier, 2018-02)
      For their apparent morphological simplicity, the Platyhelminthes or “flatworms” are a diverse clade found in a broad range of habitats. Their body plans have however made them difficult to robustly classify. Molecular evidence is only beginning to uncover the true evolutionary history of this clade. Here we present nine novel mitochondrial genomes from the still undersampled orders Polycladida and Rhabdocoela, assembled from short Illumina reads. In particular we present for the first time in the literature the mitochondrial sequence of a Rhabdocoel, Bothromesostoma personatum (Typhloplanidae, Mesostominae). The novel mitochondrial genomes examined generally contained the 36 genes expected in the Platyhelminthes, with all possessing 12 of the 13 protein-coding genes normally found in metazoan mitochondrial genomes (ATP8 being absent from all Platyhelminth mtDNA sequenced to date), along with two ribosomal RNA genes. The majority presented possess 22 transfer RNA genes, and a single tRNA gene was absent from two of the nine assembled genomes. By comparison of mitochondrial gene order and phylogenetic analysis of the protein coding and ribosomal RNA genes contained within these sequences with those of previously sequenced species we are able to gain a firm molecular phylogeny for the inter-relationships within this clade. Our phylogenetic reconstructions, using both nucleotide and amino acid sequences under several models and both Bayesian and Maximum Likelihood methods, strongly support the monophyly of Polycladida, and the monophyly of Acotylea and Cotylea within that clade. They also allow us to speculate on the early emergence of Macrostomida, the monophyly of a “Turbellarian-like” clade, the placement of Rhabditophora, and that of Platyhelminthes relative to the Lophotrochozoa (=Spiralia). The data presented here therefore represent a significant advance in our understanding of platyhelminth phylogeny, and will form the basis of a range of future research in the still-disputed classifications within this taxon.
    • Rare earth elements in phoscorites and carbonatites of the Devonian Kola Alkaline Province, Russia: Examples from Kovdor, Khibina, Vuoriyarvi and Turiy Mys complexes

      Zaitsev, AN; Terry Williams, C; Jeffries, T; Strekopytov, S; Moutte, J; Ivashchenkova, OV; Spratt, J; Petrov, SV; Wall, F; Seltmann, Reimar; et al. (Elsevier, 2014-09)
      he Devonian (ca. 385–360 Ma) Kola Alkaline Province includes 22 plutonic ultrabasic–alkaline complexes, some of which also contain carbonatites and rarely phoscorites. The latter are composite silicate–oxide–phosphate–carbonate rocks, occurring in close space-time genetic relations with various carbonatites. Several carbonatites types are recognized at Kola, including abundant calcite carbonatites (early- and late-stage), with subordinate amounts of late-stage dolomite carbonatites, and rarely magnesite, siderite and rhodochrosite carbonatites. In phoscorites and early-stage carbonatites the rare earth elements (REE) are distributed among the major minerals including calcite (up to 490 ppm), apatite (up to 4400 ppm in Kovdor and 3.5 wt.% REE2O3 in Khibina), and dolomite (up to 77 ppm), as well as accessory pyrochlore (up to 9.1 wt.% REE2O3) and zirconolite (up to 17.8 wt.% REE2O3). Late-stage carbonatites, at some localities, are strongly enriched in REE (up to 5.2 wt.% REE2O3 in Khibina) and the REE are major components in diverse major and minor minerals such as burbankite, carbocernaite, Ca- and Ba-fluocarbonates, ancylite and others. The rare earth minerals form two distinct mineral assemblages: primary (crystallized from a melt or carbohydrothermal fluid) and secondary (formed during metasomatic replacement). Stable (C–O) and radiogenic (Sr–Nd) isotopes data indicate that the REE minerals and their host calcite and/or dolomite have crystallized from a melt derived from the same mantle source and are co-genetic.
    • Towards the identification of ancestrally shared regenerative mechanisms across the Metazoa: A Transcriptomic case study in the Demosponge Halisarca caerulea

      Kenny, NJ; de Goeij, JM; de Bakker, DM; Whalen, CG; Berezikov, E; Riesgo, A (Elsevier, 2018-02)
      Regeneration is an essential process for all multicellular organisms, allowing them to recover effectively from internal and external injury. This process has been studied extensively in a medical context in vertebrates, with pathways often investigated mechanistically, both to derive increased understanding and as potential drug targets for therapy. Several species from other parts of the metazoan tree of life, including Hydra, planarians and echinoderms, noted for their regenerative capabilities, have previously been targeted for study. Less well-documented for their regenerative abilities are sponges. This is surprising, as they are both one of the earliest-branching extant metazoan phyla on Earth, and are rapidly able to respond to injury. Their sessile lifestyle, lack of an external protective layer, inability to respond to predation and filter-feeding strategy all mean that regeneration is often required. In particular the demosponge genus Halisarca has been noted for its fast cell turnover and ability to quickly adjust its cell kinetic properties to repair damage through regeneration. However, while the rate and structure of regeneration in sponges has begun to be investigated, the molecular mechanisms behind this ability are yet to be catalogued. Here we describe the assembly of a reference transcriptome for Halisarca caerulea, along with additional transcriptomes noting response to injury before, shortly following (2 h post-), and 12 h after trauma. RNAseq reads were assembled using Trinity, annotated, and samples compared, to allow initial insight into the transcriptomic basis of sponge regenerative processes. These resources are deep, with our reference assembly containing > 92.6% of the BUSCO Metazoa set of genes, and well-assembled (N50s of 836, 957, 1688 and 2032 for untreated, 2 h, 12 h and reference transcriptomes respectively), and therefore represent excellent qualitative resources as a bedrock for future study. The generation of transcriptomic resources from sponges before and following deliberate damage has allowed us to study particular pathways within this species responsible for repairing damage. We note particularly the involvement of the Wnt cascades in this process in this species, and detail the contents of this cascade, along with cell cycle, extracellular matrix and apoptosis-linked genes in this work. This resource represents an initial starting point for the continued development of this knowledge, given H. caerulea's ability to regenerate and position as an outgroup for comparing the process of regeneration across metazoan lineages. With this resource in place, we can begin to infer the regenerative capacity of the common ancestor of all extant animal life, and unravel the elements of regeneration in an often-overlooked clade.
    • The use of anthropogenic marine debris as a nesting material by brown boobies (Sula leucogaster)

      Grant, ML; Lavers, JL; Stuckenbrock, S; Sharp, PB; Bond, AL (Elsevier, 2018-10-11)
      Marine debris is pervasive worldwide, and affects biota negatively. We compared the characteristics of debris incorporated within brown booby (Sula leucogaster) nests throughout their pantropical distribution by assessing the type, colour and mass of debris items within nests and in beach transects at 18 sites, to determine if nests are indicators of the amount of debris in local marine environments. Debris was present in 14.4% of nests surveyed, with the proportion of nests with debris varying among sites (range: 0–100%). There was minimal overlap between the type or colour of debris found in nests and on adjacent beaches at individual sites. This suggests that brown boobies do not select debris uniformly across their distribution. We propose that the nests of brown boobies can be used as a sentinel of marine debris pollution of their local environment.