• Sadiman Volcano, Crater Highlands, Tanzania; does it really contain melilitites and carbonatites or its is just a phonolite-nephelinite volcano?

      Zaitsev, AN; Wenzel, T; Markl, G; Spratt, J; Petrov, SV; Williams, CT (Department of Mineralogy, Geochemistry and Petrology, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary, 2012)
      Sadiman is 4.8-4.0 Ma old volcano located in the Crater Highlands area in northern Tanzania. Limited published data and field observations show that it consists of interlayered phonolitic tuffs and nephelinitic lavas. Rare xenoliths of phonolite and ijolite were observed in the nephelinites. It was suggested that Sadiman volcano contains melilititic and carbonatitic rocks. These also occur as tuffs in the Laetoli area where fossilised footprints from human ancestors are known which is why Sadiman is of special interest as a possible source of them.
    • Scorodite precipitation in the presence of antimony

      Kossoff, D; Welch, MD; Hudson-Edwards, KA (2015-06)
    • Scratchpads 2.0: a Virtual Research Environment supporting scholarly collaboration, communication and data publication in biodiversity science

      Smith, V; Rycroft, S; Brake, I; Scott, B; Baker, E; Livermore, L; Blagoderov, V; Roberts, D (Pensoft, 2011-11-28)
      The Scratchpad Virtual Research Environment (http://scratchpads.eu/) is a flexible system for people to create their own research networks supporting natural history science. Here we describe Version 2 of the system characterised by the move to Drupal 7 as the Scratchpad core development framework and timed to coincide with the fifth year of the project’s operation in late January 2012. The development of Scratchpad 2 reflects a combination of technical enhancements that make the project more sustainable, combined with new features intended to make the system more functional and easier to use. A roadmap outlining strategic plans for development of the Scratchpad project over the next two years concludes this article.
    • Seasonal ingestion of anthropogenic debris in an urban population of gulls

      Stewart, LG; Lavers, JL; Grant, ML; Puskic, PS; Bond, AL (Elsevier BV, 2020-08-15)
      Gulls are generalist seabirds, increasingly drawn to urban environments where many species take advantage of abundant food sources, such as landfill sites. Despite this, data on items ingested at these locations, including human refuse, is limited. Here we investigate ingestion of prey and anthropogenic debris items in boluses (regurgitated pellets) from Pacific Gulls (Larus pacificus). A total of 374 boluses were collected between 2018 and 2020 in Tasmania. Debris was present in 92.51% of boluses (n = 346), with plastic (86.63%, n = 324) and glass (64.71%, n = 242) being the most prominent types. An abundance of intact, household items (e.g., dental floss, food wrappers) suggest the gulls regularly feed at landfill sites. In addition, the boluses are deposited at a roosting site located within an important wetland, thus we propose that the gulls may be functioning as a previously unrecognised vector of anthropogenic debris from urban centres to aquatic environments.
    • The second and third documented records of Antarctic Tern Sterna vittata in Brazil

      Carlos, Caio J; Daudt, Nicholas W; van Grouw, Hein; Neves, Tatiana (British Ornithologists' Club, 2017-12-11)
    • SEM-microphotogrammetry, a new take on an old method for generating high-resolution 3D models from SEM images

      Ball, AD; JOB, PA; WALKER, AEL (Wiley, 2017-03-22)
      The method we present here uses a scanning electron microscope programmed via macros to automatically capture dozens of images at suitable angles to generate accurate, detailed three‐dimensional (3D) surface models with micron‐scale resolution. We demonstrate that it is possible to use these Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) images in conjunction with commercially available software originally developed for photogrammetry reconstructions from Digital Single Lens Reflex (DSLR) cameras and to reconstruct 3D models of the specimen. These 3D models can then be exported as polygon meshes and eventually 3D printed. This technique offers the potential to obtain data suitable to reconstruct very tiny features (e.g. diatoms, butterfly scales and mineral fabrics) at nanometre resolution. Ultimately, we foresee this as being a useful tool for better understanding spatial relationships at very high resolution. However, our motivation is also to use it to produce 3D models to be used in public outreach events and exhibitions, especially for the blind or partially sighted.
    • Sensitivity and Specificity of a Urine Circulating Anodic Antigen Test for the Diagnosis of Schistosoma haematobium in Low Endemic Settings

      Knopp, S; Corstjens, PLAM; Koukounari, A; Cercamondi, CI; Ame, SM; Ali, SM; de Dood, CJ; Mohammed, KA; Utzinger, J; Rollinson, D; et al. (2015-05-14)
    • Sequestration of Martian CO2 by mineral carbonation

      Tomkinson, T; Lee, MR; Mark, DF; Smith, CL (Springer Science and Business Media LLC, 2013-10-22)
      Carbonation is the water-mediated replacement of silicate minerals, such as olivine, by carbonate, and is commonplace in the Earth’s crust. This reaction can remove significant quantities of CO2 from the atmosphere and store it over geological timescales. Here we present the first direct evidence for CO2 sequestration and storage on Mars by mineral carbonation. Electron beam imaging and analysis show that olivine and a plagioclase feldspar-rich mesostasis in the Lafayette meteorite have been replaced by carbonate. The susceptibility of olivine to replacement was enhanced by the presence of smectite veins along which CO2-rich fluids gained access to grain interiors. Lafayette was partially carbonated during the Amazonian, when liquid water was available intermittently and atmospheric CO2 concentrations were close to their present-day values. Earlier in Mars’ history, when the planet had a much thicker atmosphere and an active hydrosphere, carbonation is likely to have been an effective mechanism for sequestration of CO2.
    • Sex biases in bird and mammal natural history collections.

      Cooper, N; Bond, AL; Davis, JL; Portela Miguez, R; Tomsett, L; Helgen, Kristofer (Royal Society, 2019-10-23)
      Natural history specimens are widely used across ecology, evolutionary biology and conservation. Although biological sex may influence all of these areas, it is often overlooked in large-scale studies using museum specimens. If collections are biased towards one sex, studies may not be representative of the species. Here, we investigate sex ratios in over two million bird and mammal specimen records from five large international museums. We found a slight bias towards males in birds (40% females) and mammals (48% females), but this varied among orders. The proportion of female specimens has not significantly changed in 130 years, but has decreased in species with showy male traits like colourful plumage and horns. Body size had little effect. Male bias was strongest in name-bearing types; only 27% of bird and 39% of mammal types were female. These results imply that previous studies may be impacted by undetected male bias, and vigilance is required when using specimen data, collecting new specimens and designating types.
    • Sexual and geographic dimorphism in northern rockhopper penguins breeding in the South Atlantic Ocean

      Steinfurth, A; Booth, JM; White, J; Bond, AL; McQuaid, CD (Inter-Research Science Center, 2019-08-22)
      The Endangered northern rockhopper penguin Eudyptes moseleyi, like all penguins, is monomorphic, making sex determination of individuals in the field challenging. We examined the degree of sexual size dimorphism of adult birds across the species’ breeding range in the Atlantic Ocean and developed discriminant functions (DF) to predict individuals’ sex using morphometric measurements. We found significant site-specific differences in both bill length and bill depth, with males being the larger sex on each island. Across all islands, bill length contributed 78% to dissimilarity between sexes. Penguins on Gough Island had significantly longer bills, whilst those from Tristan da Cunha had the deepest. Island-specific DFs correctly classified 82-94% of individuals, and all functions performed significantly better than chance. The model for Nightingale Island correctly classified the greatest proportion of individuals (94-95%), while that for Tristan da Cunha performed the poorest (80-82%). A discriminant function derived from all sites accurately sexed 86-88% of northern rockhopper penguins achieving similar accuracy to island-specific functions. While molecular techniques conclusively determine an individual’s sex, morphometric measurements can provide a reliable estimate with close to 90% accuracy using a method that is less invasive and requires little technical expertise. Sexing is an important tool for meaningful interpretation of ecological data. Consideration of sex-specific differences in future studies will aid investigation of a potential sex-dependent vulnerability in this Endangered species.
    • sFDvent: A global trait database for deep‐sea hydrothermal‐vent fauna

      Chapman, Abbie; Beaulieu, SE; Colaço, A; Gebruk, AV; Hilario, A; KIHARA, TC; Ramirez‐Llodra, E; Sarrazin, J; Tunnicliffe, V; Amon, Diva; et al. (Wiley, 2019-07-30)
      Motivation: Traits are increasingly being used to quantify global biodiversity patterns, with trait databases growing in size and number, across diverse taxa. Despite grow‐ ing interest in a trait‐based approach to the biodiversity of the deep sea, where the impacts of human activities (including seabed mining) accelerate, there is no single re‐ pository for species traits for deep‐sea chemosynthesis‐based ecosystems, including hydrothermal vents. Using an international, collaborative approach, we have compiled the first global‐scale trait database for deep‐sea hydrothermal‐vent fauna – sFD‐ vent (sDiv‐funded trait database for the Functional Diversity of vents). We formed a funded working group to select traits appropriate to: (a) capture the performance of vent species and their influence on ecosystem processes, and (b) compare trait‐based diversity in different ecosystems. Forty contributors, representing expertise across most known hydrothermal‐vent systems and taxa, scored species traits using online collaborative tools and shared workspaces. Here, we characterise the sFDvent da‐ tabase, describe our approach, and evaluate its scope. Finally, we compare the sFD‐ vent database to similar databases from shallow‐marine and terrestrial ecosystems to highlight how the sFDvent database can inform cross‐ecosystem comparisons. We also make the sFDvent database publicly available online by assigning a persistent, unique DOI. Main types of variable contained: Six hundred and forty‐six vent species names, associated location information (33 regions), and scores for 13 traits (in categories: community structure, generalist/specialist, geographic distribution, habitat use, life history, mobility, species associations, symbiont, and trophic structure). Contributor IDs, certainty scores, and references are also provided. Spatial location and grain: Global coverage (grain size: ocean basin), spanning eight ocean basins, including vents on 12 mid‐ocean ridges and 6 back‐arc spreading centres. Time period and grain: sFDvent includes information on deep‐sea vent species, and associated taxonomic updates, since they were first discovered in 1977. Time is not recorded. The database will be updated every 5 years. Major taxa and level of measurement: Deep‐sea hydrothermal‐vent fauna with spe‐ cies‐level identification present or in progress. Software format: .csv and MS Excel (.xlsx).
    • Shedding light on the ‘dark side’ of phylogenetic comparative methods

      Cooper, N; Thomas, GH; FitzJohn, RG; O'Hara, RB (2016-06)
    • Shells from the shoreline - a new perspective on changing Lake Tanganyika

      Todd, JA; Michel, E; Titxcomb, M (ZenodoBologna, 2020-02-03)
      Using past records to provide context and guidance in a changing world. Overwhelming evidence shows that ecological, evolutionary and earth system processes have been profoundly altered by humans, and will continue to be altered for millennia to come. But, what was life like before human impacts and what processes brought us into the Anthropocene epoch? The rapidly growing field of Conservation Paleobiology uses fossil and historical records to provide valuable context and guidance to conservation of life on Earth. This symposium was organised by Aaron O'Dea, Daniele Scarponi, Laura Airoldi & Paolo Albano. It brought over 80 students and researchers together to provide an informal venue for lively talks and a chance to meet old and new colleagues.
    • The Shenzhen Declaration on Plant Sciences-Uniting plant sciences and society to build a green, sustainable Earth

      Crane, PR; Ge, S; Hong, D-Y; Huang, H-W; Jiao, G-L; Knapp, S; Kress, WJ; Mooney, H; Raven, PH; Wen, J; et al. (2017-09)