• Assessing myxozoan presence and diversity using environmental DNA

      Hartikainen, H; Bass, D; Briscoe, AG; Knipe, H; Green, AJ; Okamura, B (2016-11)
    • Conditional persistence and tolerance characterize endoparasite–colonial host interactions

      Fontes, I; Hartikainen, H; Taylor, Nick GH; Okamura, B (2017-07)
    • Connectivity and zebra mussel invasion offer short‐term buffering of eutrophication impacts on floodplain lake landscape biodiversity

      Salgado, J; Sayer, CD; Brooks, SJ; Davidson, TA; Baker, AG; Willby, N; Patmore, IR; Goldsmith, B; Bennion, H; Okamura, B (Wiley, 2019-05-16)
      Aim To investigate if connectivity and zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) occurrence can mitigate effects of eutrophication in a lowland lake landscape. Location Upper Lough Erne, Northern Ireland, UK. Methods Data on environment, macrophytes and invertebrates were assembled for three basins of a large central lake and its satellite floodplain lakes via field surveys and palaeolimnological analyses. Space–time interaction analyses of palaeoecological data were compared pre‐1950 and post‐1950. Multivariate analyses examined how connectivity, environment and zebra mussels influenced contemporary lake communities, and explain their divergence from historical communities in the past. Results Pre‐1950, we found high community variation across sites and low within‐lake variation in macrophytes, but progressive eutrophication accentuated within‐lake community variation after 1950. Partitioning analysis showed larger effects of connectivity than nutrient enrichment on contemporary macrophyte composition, while local effects structured invertebrate communities. Three clusters of lakes were revealed according to variation in macrophyte composition, isolation from the central lake and nutrient enrichment: Group 1– the central lake and six nearby lakes were meso‐eutrophic (TP = 66.7 ± 47.6 μg/L; TN = 0.79 ± 0.41 mg/L) and had the highest zebra mussel abundances and organismal biodiversity; Group 2– Eight eutrophic (TP = 112±36.6 μg/L; TN = 1.25 ± 0.5 mg/L) and connected lakes; Group 3– Seven isolated and hypertrophic (TP = 163.2 ± 101.5 μg/L; TN = 1.55 ± 0.3 mg/L) lakes. Pre‐1950 palaeolimnological data for macrophytes and invertebrates for 5 lakes and a basin in the central lake most resembled extant lake communities of Group 1. However, palaeo‐records revealed that macrophytes and invertebrates subsequently converged towards those of Groups 2 and 3. Main conclusions Our study reveals that the central “mother” lake acts as a hub for preserving biodiversity via shared hydrological connectivity with satellite lakes and high zebra mussel abundances. These may buffer the impoverishing effects of eutrophication and sustain unexpectedly high biodiversity in the short term. Such protective buffering, however, cannot be relied upon indefinitely to conserve biodiversity.
    • Eutrophication erodes inter-basin variation in macrophytes and co-occurring invertebrates in a shallow lake: combining ecology and palaeoecology

      Salgado, J; Sayer, CD; Brooks, SJ; Davidson, TA; Okamura, B (Springer, 2017-03-13)
      Aquatic biodiversity is commonly linked with environmental variation in lake networks, but less is known about how local factors may influence within-lake biological heterogeneity. Using a combined ecological and multi-proxy palaeoecological approach we investigated long-term changes in the pathways and processes that underlie eutrophication and water depth effects on lake macrophyte and invertebrate communities across three basins in a shallow lake—Castle Lough, Northern Ireland, UK. Contemporary data allow us to assess how macrophyte assemblages vary in composition and heterogeneity according to basin-specific factors (e.g. variation in water depth), while palaeoecological data (macrophytes and co-occurring invertebrates) enable us to infer basin-specific impacts and susceptibilities to nutrient-enrichment. Results indicate that variability in water depth promotes assemblage variation amongst the lake basins, stimulating within-lake macrophyte assemblage heterogeneity and hence higher lake biodiversity. The palaeo-data indicate that eutrophication has acted as a strong homogenising agent of macrophyte and invertebrate diversities and abundances over time at the whole-lake scale. This novel finding strongly suggests that, as eutrophication advances, the influence of water depth on community heterogeneity is gradually eroded and that ultimately a limited set of eutrophication-tolerant species will become homogeneously distributed across the entire lake.
    • Eutrophication homogenizes shallow lake macrophyte assemblages over space and time

      Salgado, J; Sayer, CD; Brooks, SJ; Davidson, TA; Goldsmith, B; Patmore, IR; Baker, AG; Okamura, B (Ecological Society of America, 2018-09-11)
      Eutrophication is commonly implicated in the reduction in macrophyte species richness in shallow lakes. However, the extent to which other more nuanced measures of macrophyte diversity, such as assemblage heterogeneity, are impacted concurrently by eutrophication over space and time and the joint influences of other factors (e.g., species invasions and connectivity) remains relatively poorly documented. Using a combination of contemporary and paleoecological data, we examine how eutrophication influences macrophyte assemblage heterogeneity and how nutrient enrichment interacts with watercourse connectivity, lake surface area, and relative zebra mussel abundance over space (within and among lakes) and time (decades to centuries) at the landscape scale. The study system is the Upper Lough Erne, Northern Ireland, UK, which is composed of a large main lake and several smaller satellite lakes that vary in their hydrological connectivity to the main lake. By applying homogeneity analysis of multivariate dispersions and partial redundancy analysis, we demonstrate that contemporary lake macrophyte heterogeneity and species richness are reduced in lakes with intensified eutrophication but are increased in lakes with greater zebra mussel abundance and lake surface area. Watercourse connectivity positively influenced assemblage heterogeneity and explained larger proportions of the variation in assemblage heterogeneity than local environmental factors, whereas variation in species richness was better related to local abiotic factors. Macrophyte fossil data revealed within- and among-lake assemblage homogenization post-1960, with the main lake and connected sites showing the highest rates of homogenization due to progressive eutrophication. The long-term and contemporary data collectively indicate that eutrophication reduces assemblage heterogeneity over time by overriding the importance of regional processes (e.g., connectivity) and exerts stronger pressure on isolated lakes. Our results suggest further that in connected lake systems, assemblage heterogeneity may be impacted more rapidly by eutrophication than species richness. This means that early effects of eutrophication in many systems may be underestimated by monitoring that focuses solely on species richness and is not performed at adequate landscape scales.
    • Extensive Uncharted Biodiversity: The Parasite Dimension

      Okamura, B; Hartigan, A; Naldoni, J (Oxford University Press, 2018-09-18)
      Parasites are often hidden in their hosts and exhibit patchy spatial distributions. This makes them relatively difficult to detect and sample. Consequently we have poor knowledge of parasite diversities, distributions, and extinction. We evaluate our general understanding of parasite diversity and highlight the enormous bias in research on parasites such as helminths and arthropods that infect vertebrate hosts. We then focus on Myxozoa as an exemplary case for demonstrating uncharted parasite diversity. Myxozoans are a poorly recognized but speciose clade of endoparasitic cnidarians with complex life cycles that have radiated to exploit freshwater, marine, and terrestrial hosts by adopting strategies convergent to those of parasitic protists. Myxozoans are estimated to represent some 20% of described cnidarian species—greatly outnumbering the combined species richness of scyphozoans, cubozoans, and staurozoans. We summarize limited understanding of myxozoan diversification and geographical distributions, and highlight gaps in knowledge and approaches for measuring myxozoan diversity. We close by reviewing methods and problems in estimating parasite extinction and concerns about extinction risks in view of the fundamental roles parasites play in ecosystem dynamics and in driving host evolutionary trajectories.
    • Form and metabolic scaling in colonial animals

      Hartikainen, H; Humphries, S; Okamura, B (2014-03-01)
    • Looking beyond the mountain: dispersal barriers in a changing world

      Caplat, P; Edelaar, P; Dudaniec, RY; Green, AJ; Okamura, B; Cote, J; Ekroos, J; Jonsson, PR; Löndahl, J; Tesson, SVM; et al. (2016-06)
    • Malacosporean myxozoans exploit a diversity of fish hosts

      Naldoni, Juliana; Adriano, EA; hartigan, ashlie; Sayer, C; Okamura, B (Cambridge University Press (CUP), 2019-06)
      Myxozoans are widespread and common endoparasites of fish with complex life cycles, infecting vertebrate and invertebrate hosts. There are two classes: Myxosporea and Malacosporea. To date about 2500 myxosporean species have been described. By comparison, there are only five described malacosporean species. Malacosporean development in the invertebrate hosts (freshwater bryozoans) has been relatively well studied but is poorly known in fish hosts. Our aim was to investigate the presence and development of malacosporeans infecting a diversity of fish from Brazil, Europe and the USA. We examined kidney from 256 fish belonging variously to the Salmonidae, Cyprinidae, Nemacheilidae, Esocidae, Percidae, Polyodontidae, Serrasalmidae, Cichlidae and Pimelodidae. Malacosporean infections were detected and identified by polymerase chain reaction and small subunit ribosomal DNA sequencing, and the presence of sporogonic stages was evaluated by ultrastructural examination. We found five malacosporean infections in populations of seven European fish species (brown trout, rainbow trout, white fish, dace, roach, gudgeon and stone loach). Ultrastructural analyses revealed sporogonic stages in kidney tubules of three fish species (brown trout, roach and stone loach), providing evidence that fish belonging to at least three families are true hosts. These results expand the range of fish hosts exploited by malacosporeans to complete their life cycle.
    • Measuring Biodiversity and Extinction-Present and Past

      Sigwart, JD; Bennett, KD; Edie, SM; Mander, L; Okamura, B; Padian, K; Wheeler, Q; Winston, JE; Yeung, NW (Oxford Academic, 2018-09-18)
      How biodiversity is changing in our time represents a major concern for all organismal biologists. Anthropogenic changes to our planet are decreasing species diversity through the negative effects of pollution, habitat destruction, direct extirpation of species, and climate change. But major biotic changes—including those that have both increased and decreased species diversity—have happened before in Earth’s history. Biodiversity dynamics in past eras provide important context to understand ecological responses to current environmental change. The work of assessing biodiversity is woven into ecology, environmental science, conservation, paleontology, phylogenetics, evolutionary and developmental biology, and many other disciplines; yet, the absolute foundation of how we measure species diversity depends on taxonomy and systematics. The aspiration of this symposium, and complementary contributed talks, was to promote better understanding of our common goals and encourage future interdisciplinary discussion of biodiversity dynamics. The contributions in this collection of papers bring together a diverse group of speakers to confront several important themes. How can biologists best respond to the urgent need to identify and conserve diversity? How can we better communicate the nature of species across scientific disciplines? Where are the major gaps in knowledge about the diversity of living animal and plant groups, and what are the implications for understanding potential diversity loss? How can we effectively use the fossil record of past diversity and extinction to understand current biodiversity loss?
    • Mikrocytids Are a Broadly Distributed and Divergent Radiation of Parasites in Aquatic Invertebrates

      Hartikainen, H; Stentiford, GD; Bateman, KS; Berney, C; Feist, SW; Longshaw, M; Okamura, B; Stone, D; Ward, G; Wood, C; et al. (2014-03)
    • A new species of the cheilostome bryozoan Chiastosella in the Southern Ocean, past and present

      Ragazzola, F; Taylor, PD; Bazzicalupo, P; Okamura, B; Schmidt, DN (2014-06)
    • Phylogenetically Widespread Polyembryony in Cyclostome Bryozoans and the Protracted Asynchronous Release of Clonal Brood-Mates

      Jenkins, HL; Waeschenbach, A; Okamura, B; Hughes, RN; Bishop, JDD; Hejnol, A (2017-01-17)