• Bees, wasps, flowers and other biological records from Hartslock Nature Reserve, Berkshire UK: records made 2015-2016

      Notton, DG (Natural History Museum, 2018-07-20)
      Abstract: A list of records of bees, wasps, and the flowers they visit and other biological records recorded during 2015-2016 from Hartslock Nature Reserve, Berkshire UK and vicinity. Collections were made in order to provide fresh material for DNA sequencing for a national DNA barcode database of British Bees (Tang et al., 2017). Voucher specimens are preserved in the collection of the Natural HIstory Museum London. Hartslock is a Special Areas of Conservation (SAC) Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) managed by the Berks, Bucks & Oxon Wildlife Trust (BBOWT).
    • The biology of Death’s Head Hawkmoths, lepidopteran kleptoparasites of honey bees

      Kitching, I (Natural History Museum, 2006-06)
      This booklet gives basic information on the death's head hawkmoth, Acherontia atropos, including its feeding biology, life history, geographical distribution in the world, phylogenetics, and the evolutionary and behavioural relationship it has with honey bees.
    • Bye-bye dark sky: is light pollution costing us more than just the night-time?

      Lotzof, K; Van Grouw, H; West, S (Natural History Museum, 2018-10-23)
      Humans, birds and several other animals are finding it increasingly challenging to experience night-time uninterrupted by artificial light, while some creatures are handling the change better than others. Hein van Grouw, Senior Curator of Birds, and UK Biodiversity Training Manager Steph West reveal the impacts of light pollution on British wildlife and a few tips for reclaiming your slice of the night sky.
    • DeWorm 3: Charting a path towards STH elimination.

      DWorm3 (Natural History Museum, 2020-01-30)
    • NHM Science and Society Blog. New plans for the Museum's green spaces: connecting people and nature

      Tweddle, JC (Natural History Museum, 2016-07-08)
      A little over a month ago, the Museum applied for planning permission to continue with an ambitious transformation of its outdoor spaces. Drs John Tweddle, Paul Kenrick and Sandy Knapp of the Museum’s Science Group provide the background to the project and clarify its impact on the Wildlife Garden.