• The Airless Project

      Allington-Jones, L; Trafford, A (Natural Sciences Collections Association, 2017-04-20)
      A project to combat pyrite oxidation at the NHM (London, UK) is currently in its second year. The project aims to undertake conservation treatments and store highest risk specimens in low oxygen microenvironments. An emergent benefit of the conservation-driven project has been the digitisation of specimens on the collection management system KE Emu, through the use of barcodes and web-based applications.
    • Bridging the Skills Gap in UK Species Identification: Lessons Learnt & Next Steps

      West, SVL; Tweddle, JC (National Biodiversity Network, 2017-11-17)
      As the Identification Trainers for the Future project draws to a close, we take this opportunity to reflect on what we have learnt from the project and where the Natural History Museum is heading next in terms of supporting UK natural history skills development.
    • Conservation in a Barcode Age: A cross-discipline re-storage project for pyritic specimens

      Allington-Jones, L; Trafford, A (International Council of Museums, 2017-01-01)
      The dichotomy of conservation and access has long been recognised within the museum profession. The recent push for digitisation has added a new dimension to this argument: digital records can both increase potential access, due to increased awareness of the existence of objects, and decrease potential handling, since a more thorough awareness of an object creates a more informed decision regarding whether access is actually necessary. The use of barcodes and the creation of digital resources have therefore been incorporated into a re-storage project at the Natural History Museum, London to reduce duplication of work (and handling) by staff and to combat the reduction in access caused by the enclosure of objects within microenvironments, which in turn helps preserve specimens for future access. This project demonstrates how conservation and digitisation can successfully synthesise through the use of barcodes, when working with a cross-discipline team.
    • Identification Trainers for the Future: Bridging the skills gap in natural history

      West, SVL (Linnean Society, 2017-09-07)
      The Identification Trainers for the Future project has been a 3-year project developing a new model of species identification training for the Museum, while also looking at sector-related career issues, particularly methods of recruitment from non-traditional entry routes into the UK biodiversity and museums sectors. Through funding from the HLF’s Skills for the Future programme and working in partnership with the NBNT and FSC, 15 trainees have worked through 12-month long work-based traineeships with us, developing their technical skills in species identification for cryptic UK taxa and developing experience in teaching and scientific communication. This talk will look at some of the lessons learnt from the project, as well as discussing some of the ways forward for the Museum now the project is starting to draw to a close.
    • A Late Miocene methane-seep fauna from Kalimantan, Indonesia

      Kiel, S; Reich, S; Renema, W; Taylor, JD; Wesselingh, FP; Todd, JA; Anon (Instytut Paleobiologii PAN.Warsaw, 2016-06-13)
    • Lycopodiella inundata: insights into plant-fungal associations in early vascular plants

      Kowal, J; Duckett, J; Jacob, A; Rimington, W; Bidartondo, M; Field, K; Schornack, S; Pressel, S (2017-03-07)
      Recent studies have revealed that extant basal vascular plants associate with a wide range of Mucoromycotina and/or Glomeromycota fungi, paralleling the same in non-vascular liverworts and hornworts. This dispels the long-held paradigm that these early diverging lineages harbour Glomeromycota exclusively. Endophytes belonging to both fungal lineages have also been reported, for the first time, in a Devonian plant (Horneophyton ligneri). Together these discoveries point to much more diverse plant-fungus interactions in early vascular plants than previously assumed, however our understanding of these remains limited. In order to gain further insights into these key partnerships, especially those involving the early diverging Mucoromycotina, we are developing the lycophyte Lycopodiella inundata as an experimental system. L. inundata sporophytes have been shown to harbour solely Mucoromycotina fungi but equally fundamental, the identity of its gametophyte endophyte remains unknown. Using molecular and cytological approaches, we confirm that young L. inundata sporophytes are colonized exclusively by Mucoromycotina and show that the cytology of colonisation - consisting of both inter- and intracellular phases - closely resembles that in Haplomitriopsida liverwort-Mucoromycotina partnerships and the corm of H. ligneri. Our current isolation, resynthesis and molecular studies will provide further insights into both host and fungi specificity.
    • The marine mollusc collection at the Natural History Museum, London

      Salvador, A (2016-07-01)
      The Natural History Museum, London holds one of the largest and most important collections of molluscs in the world with an estimate 8 million specimens. The marine collection includes around 40,000 type lots for the phylum, mainly from the collections of Cuming, Sowerby, Smith, Gray, Adams, Melvill, Hinds, Carpenter, d’Orbigny, to name a few. As well as the scientific importance of the collections, a wealth of material originating with Sloane, Banks, Cook, Darwin, Lyell, Cracherode and Montagu gives an unparalleled historic dimension to our holdings. A dedicated library of over 6,000 bound volumes and 30,000 reprints on molluscs, dating from the 17th century, provides an incredibly accessible source of information to support collections, curation and research.
    • Reduction of eyes in last-instar beetle larvae: a special observation in Trictenotomidae, based on Trictenotoma formosana Kriesche, 1919

      Telnov, D; Hu, F-S; Pollock, DA; Lin, Z-R (2019-10-03)
      Recently, Lin & Hu (2018, 2019) unraveled the biology of Trictenotoma formosana Kriesche, 1919. For the first time since Gahan (1908) there is fresh immature stages material available for Trictenotomidae.
    • Training needs and recommendations for Citizen Science participants, facilitators and designers

      Lorke, Julia; Golumbic, YN; Ramjan, C; Atias, O (COST Action 15212, 2019-11-15)
      In this report, we aimed to systematise and elaborate on the ideas discussed during the COST Action WG2 workshop “Systematic review on training requirements and recommendations for Citizen Science” that took place in Riga on 12-13th November 2018. Building on the input from the workshop participants’ broad range of different perspectives and expertise in citizen science and education, we compiled a list of training needs for project participants, project facilitators and project designers in citizen science and categorised them into core, operational and engagement needs. Based on our experience we discussed challenges that may need to be considered when designing training in citizen science. We then addressed the needs by formulating recommendations and pointing out available resources that have been proven to be useful in our own citizen science research and practice. While we acknowledge that these training needs and training recommendations may not be complete, we believe that our approach from needs to recommendations can act as a helpful working model when designing training and the list of resources provides a starting point to delve deeper into the topic and good training examples to build on. We invite the community to provide further insights into training needs and recommendations and to contribute further resources to the list