• The database of the PREDICTS (Projecting Responses of Ecological Diversity In Changing Terrestrial Systems) project

      Hudson, L; Newbold, T; Contu, S; Hill, SLL; Lysenko, I; De Palma, A; Phillips, HRP; Alhusseini, T; Bedford, FE; Bennett, DJ; et al. (2017-01)
    • Deep-sea anthropogenic macrodebris harbours rich and diverse communities of bacteria and archaea

      Woodall, LC; Jungblut, AD; Hopkins, K; Hall, A; Robinson, LF; Gwinnett, C; Paterson, GLJ (PLOS, 2018-11-28)
      The deep sea is the largest biome on earth, and microbes dominate in biomass and abundance. Anthropogenic litter is now almost ubiquitous in this biome, and its deposition creates new habitats and environments, including for microbial assemblages. With the ever increasing accumulation of this debris, it is timely to identify and describe the bacterial and archaeal communities that are able to form biofilms on macrodebris in the deep sea. Using 16S rRNA gene high throughput sequencing, we show for the first time the composition of bacteria and archaea on macrodebris collected from the deep sea. Our data suggest differences in the microbial assemblage composition across litter of different materials including metal, rubber, glass, fabric and plastic. These results imply that anthropogenic macrodebris provide diverse habitats for bacterial and archaeal biofilms and each may harbour distinct microbial communities.
    • Defining principles for mobile apps and platforms development in citizen science

      Sturm, U; Gold, M; Luna, S; Schade, S; Ceccaroni, L; Kyba, CCM; Claramunt, B; Haklay, M; Kasperowski, D; Albert, A; et al. (2018-01-04)
    • Delegating sex: differential gene expression in stolonizing syllids uncovers the hormonal control of reproduction in Annelida

      Alvarez-Campos, P; Kenny, NJ; Verdes, A; Fernandez, RM; Novo, M; Giribet, G; Riesgo, A (Oxford Academic, 2018-12-11)
      Stolonization in syllid annelids is a unique mode of reproduction among animals. During the breeding season, a structure resembling the adult but containing only gametes, called stolon, is formed generally at the posterior end of the animal. When stolons mature, they detach from the adult and gametes are released into the water column. The process is synchronized within each species, and it has been reported to be under environmental and endogenous control, probably via endocrine regulation. To further understand reproduction in syllids and to elucidate the molecular toolkit underlying stolonization, we generated Illumina RNA-seq data from different tissues of reproductive and nonreproductive individuals of Syllis magdalena and characterized gene expression during the stolonization process. Several genes involved in gametogenesis (ovochymase, vitellogenin, testis-specific serine/threonine-kinase), immune response (complement receptor 2), neuronal development (tyrosine-protein kinase Src42A), cell proliferation (alpha-1D adrenergic receptor), and steroid metabolism (hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2) were found differentially expressed in the different tissues and conditions analyzed. In addition, our findings suggest that several neurohormones, such as methyl farnesoate, dopamine, and serotonin, might trigger stolon formation, the correct maturation of gametes and the detachment of stolons when gametogenesis ends. The process seems to be under circadian control, as indicated by the expression patterns of r-opsins. Overall, our results shed light into the genes that orchestrate the onset of gamete formation and improve our understanding of how some hormones, previously reported to be involved in reproduction and metamorphosis processes in other invertebrates, seem to also regulate reproduction via stolonization.
    • The ‘Demange drawings’: known and unknown malacological contribu- tions of Victor Demange (1870-1940)

      Breure, ASH; Ablett, J (Cernuelle, 2016-09-01)
      In the Bavay archives a collection of drawings of Vietnamese land and freshwater snails is present, which have never been published. They originate from Victor Demange who had them made by a local raftsman. The drawings are here reproduced and some biographical data on Demange, and his contributions to malacology, are presented.
    • Descriptions of two new Australian genera of Anthicidae (Insecta: Coleoptera)

      Telnov, Dmitry (Baltijas Koleopterologijas Instituts/Baltic Institute of Coleopterology, 2018-12-23)
      Two new Australian Anthicidae genera, Australosteropes gen. nov. (Steropinae) and Sahulanthicus gen. nov. (Anthicinae: Anthicini) are described, diagnosed, and illustrated. Some critical morphological characters of these new groups and the subfamilies to which they belong are discussed. New combinations are made for the following 18 taxa: Australosteropes davidsonae (Armstrong, 1948) comb. nov. (from Macratria Newman, 1838), Sahulanthicus abundans (Lea, 1922) comb. nov., S. apicalis (King, 1869) comb. nov., S. baudinensis (Champion, 1895) comb. nov., S. brevicollis (King, 1869) comb. nov., S. cavifrons (Champion, 1895) comb. nov., S. crassipes (LaFerté-Sénectère, 1849) comb. nov., S. crassus (King, 1869) comb. nov., S. discoideus (Champion, 1895) comb. nov., S. immaculatus (King, 1869) comb. nov., S. inglorius (Lea, 1896) comb. nov., S. laticollis (MacLeay, 1872) comb. nov., S. luridus (King, 1869) comb. nov., S. monostigma (Champion, 1895) comb. nov., S. obliquefasciatus (King, 1869) comb. nov., S. permutatus (Pic, 1897) comb. nov., S. scutellatus (Lea, 1896) comb. nov. (all from Microhoria Chevrolat, 1877), and S. dilatipennis (Pic, 1900) comb. nov. (from Anthicus Paykull, 1798). Lectotype is designated for Sahulanthicus dilatipennis (Pic, 1900).
    • Designation of a new family group name, Tonzidae fam. nov., for the genus Tonza (Lepidoptera, Yponomeutoidea), based on immature stages of Tonza citrorrhoa

      Kobayashi, S; Matsuoka, H; Kimura, M; Sohn, J-C; Yoshiyasu, Y; Lees, David (European Journal of Taxonomy, 2018-06-12)
      The systematic position of Tonza Walker, 1864 is re-evaluated, based on the characteristics of immature stages and DNA barcodes. Larvae and pupae of Tonza citrorrhoa Meyrick, 1905 are described and illustrated for the first time. Larvae of this species form a loose web among the leaves and branches of the host plant, Putranjiva matsumurae Koidz. (Putranjivaceae Endl.). The immature stages of Tonza exhibit four unique apomorphies including: in the larva, the prolegs on A5 and A6 absent, and the seta L2 on the A1–A8 very small; in the pupa, four minute knobs are positioned in the middle portion on abdominal segments V and VI; while its caudal processes possess a W-shaped spine with numerous minute spines. These characteristics clearly distinguish Tonza from other yponomeutoid families and hence, we propose a new family group name, Tonzidae Kobayashi & Sohn fam. nov., for the genus Tonza. Existing DNA barcode data suggest a relationship with Glyphipterigidae Stainton, 1854. The family level status of Tonzidae fam. nov. provides a hypothesis that needs to be tested with larger molecular data.
    • Detection of ultrafine plastics ingested by seabirds using tissue digestion.

      Lavers, JL; Stivaktakis, G; Hutton, I; Bond, AL (Elsevier, 2019-04-06)
      Plastic debris is a major global threat to marine ecosystems and species. However, our knowledge of this issue may be incomplete due to a lack of a standardized method for quantifying ingested ultrafine particles (1 μm - 1 mm) in wildlife. This study provides the first quantification of ultrafine plastic in seabirds using chemical and biological digestion treatments to extract plastic items from seabird gizzards. The alkaline agent, potassium hydroxide, outperformed the enzyme corolase, based on cost and efficiency (e.g., digestion time). Ultrafine plastics were observed in 7.0% of Flesh-footed Shearwater (Ardenna carneipes) gizzards collected from Lord Howe Island, Australia and accounted for 3.6% of all plastic items recovered (13 out of 359 items). Existing methods for extracting ingested plastic from seabirds do not account for ultrafine particles, therefore our results indicate current seabird plastic loads, and the associated physical and biological impacts, are underestimated.
    • Development of novel multiplex microsatellite polymerase chain reactions to enable high-throughput population genetic studies of Schistosoma haematobium

      Webster, BL; Rabone, M; Pennance, T; Emery, AM; Allan, F; Gouvras, A; Knopp, S; Garba, A; Hamidou, AA; Mohammed, KA; et al. (2015-12)
    • Digest: Shape-shifting in Solanaceae flowers: The influence of pollinators*

      Dodsworth, S; Orejuela, A; Peréz-Escobar, O; Särkinen, T; Knapp, S (2018-01-30)
    • Dimensions of biodiversity loss: Spatial mismatch in land-use impacts on species, functional and phylogenetic diversity of European bees

      De Palma, A; Kuhlmann, M; Bugter, R; Ferrier, S; Hoskins, AJ; Potts, SG; Roberts, SPM; Schweiger, O; Purvis, A; Beggs, J (2017-12)
    • Discovery of a single male Aedes aegypti (L.) in Merseyside, England

      Harbach, RE; Dallimore, T; Hunter, T; Medlock, JM; Vaux, AGC; Strode, C (2017-12)
    • Discovery of an extensive deep-sea fossil serpulid reef associated with a cold seep, Santa Monica Basin, California

      Georgieva, M; Paull, CK; Little, CTS; McGann, M; Sahy, D; Condon, D; Lundsten, L; Pewsey, J; Caress, DW; Vrijenhoek, RC (Frontiers Media, 2019-03-19)
      Multibeam bathymetric mapping of the Santa Monica Basin in the eastern Pacific has revealed the existence of a number of elevated bathymetric features, or mounds, harboring cold seep communities. During 2013–2014, mounds at 600 m water depth were observed for the first time and sampled by Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute’s ROV Doc Ricketts. Active cold seeps were found, but surprisingly one of these mounds was characterized by massive deposits composed of fossil serpulid worm tubes (Annelida: Serpulidae) exhibiting various states of mineralization by authigenic carbonate. No living serpulids with equivalent tube morphologies were found at the site; hence the mound was termed “Fossil Hill.” In the present study, the identity of the fossil serpulids and associated fossil community, the ages of fossils and authigenic carbonates, the formation of the fossil serpulid aggregation, and the geological structure of the mound are explored. Results indicate that the tubes were most likely made by a deep-sea serpulid lineage, with radiocarbon dating suggesting that they have a very recent origin during the Late Pleistocene, specifically to the Last Glacial Maximum 20,000 years ago. Additional U-Th analyses of authigenic carbonates mostly corroborate the radiocarbon dates, and also indicate that seepage was occurring while the tubes were being formed. We also document similar, older deposits along the approximate trajectory of the San Pedro Basin Fault. We suggest that the serpulid tube facies formed in situ, and that the vast aggregation of these tubes at Fossil Hill is likely due to a combination of optimal physical environmental conditions and chemosynthetic production, which may have been particularly intense as a result of sea-level lowstand during the Last Glacial Maximum.