• Sadiman Volcano, Crater Highlands, Tanzania; does it really contain melilitites and carbonatites or its is just a phonolite-nephelinite volcano?

      Zaitsev, AN; Wenzel, T; Markl, G; Spratt, J; Petrov, SV; Williams, CT (Department of Mineralogy, Geochemistry and Petrology, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary, 2012)
      Sadiman is 4.8-4.0 Ma old volcano located in the Crater Highlands area in northern Tanzania. Limited published data and field observations show that it consists of interlayered phonolitic tuffs and nephelinitic lavas. Rare xenoliths of phonolite and ijolite were observed in the nephelinites. It was suggested that Sadiman volcano contains melilititic and carbonatitic rocks. These also occur as tuffs in the Laetoli area where fossilised footprints from human ancestors are known which is why Sadiman is of special interest as a possible source of them.
    • Why barcode? High-throughput multiplex sequencing of mitochondrial genomes for molecular systematics

      Timmermans, MJTN; Dodsworth, S; Culverwell, CL; Bocak, L; Ahrens, D; Littlewood, T; Pons, J; Vogler, AP (Oxford University Press (OUP), 2010-09-28)
      Mitochondrial genome sequences are important markers for phylogenetics but taxon sampling remains sporadic because of the great effort and cost required to acquire full-length sequences. Here, we demonstrate a simple, cost-effective way to sequence the full complement of protein coding mitochondrial genes from pooled samples using the 454/Roche platform. Multiplexing was achieved without the need for expensive indexing tags (‘barcodes’). The method was trialled with a set of long-range polymerase chain reaction (PCR) fragments from 30 species of Coleoptera (beetles) sequenced in a 1/16th sector of a sequencing plate. Long contigs were produced from the pooled sequences with sequencing depths ranging from ∼10 to 100× per contig. Species identity of individual contigs was established via three ‘bait’ sequences matching disparate parts of the mitochondrial genome obtained by conventional PCR and Sanger sequencing. This proved that assembly of contigs from the sequencing pool was correct. Our study produced sequences for 21 nearly complete and seven partial sets of protein coding mitochondrial genes. Combined with existing sequences for 25 taxa, an improved estimate of basal relationships in Coleoptera was obtained. The procedure could be employed routinely for mitochondrial genome sequencing at the species level, to provide improved species ‘barcodes’ that currently use the cox1 gene only.
    • Perforocycloides nathalieae new genus and species, an unusual Silurian cyclocystoid (Echinodermata) from Anticosti Island, Québec, Canada

      Graham, M; Ewin, TAM; Reich, Mike; Cournoyer, ME; Klug, C (Springer, 2019-08-22)
      Cyclocystoids are a poorly known, rare, extinct class of bi-facially flattened, disc shaped echinoderms, ranging from the Middle Ordovician to the Early Carboniferous. Articulated cyclocystoids are relatively common in the Ordovician but are rarer in younger strata. Here we describe Perforocycloides nathaliae new genus and species, from the early Silurian of Anticosti Island, Québec, Canada, the first articulated cyclocystoid from the Silurian of North America. This taxon is distinguished from other cyclocystoids by the number of variably sized marginal ossicles, the lack of interseptal plates, and the novelty of pores located in the distal part of the sutures between adjacent marginals on the dorsal surface. These dorsal intermarginal sutural pores led to canals which penetrated the contiguous area of the lateral surface of the marginals and emerged on the ventral surface between the cupules of adjacent marginals. These dorsal intermarginal sutural pores/canals appear to be unique to Perforocycloides and whilst their function is speculative, they provided some form of communication between the dorsal disc and the distal side of the ventral marginals/cupules. Perforocycloides most closely resembles the Ordovician–Silurian genus Zygocycloides, suggesting that this genus may have diversified more widely during the Silurian than previously reported. A review of global Silurian cyclocystoid distribution suggests taxa were geographically confined and that greatest diversity appears to have been located within Baltica. However, it also demonstrates our current limited knowledge. No specimens have been recorded from Gondwana (e.g. Africa, Australia, South America), Siberia, and North and South China, nor are any specimens known confidently anywhere from Přidolí strata.
    • The mineralogy of the effusive silicate rocks from the Mosonik volcano, Northern Tanzania.

      Sedova, AM; Zaitsev, AN; Spratt, J (Vernadsky Institute of Geochemistry and Anlytical Chemistry of Russian Academy of Sciences (GEOKHI RAS), 2018-10-01)
      International Conference on Magmatism of the Earth and Related Strategic Metal Deposits 3-7 September, 2018 Vernadsky Institute of Geochemistry and Analytical Chemistry of Russian Academу of Sciences, Moscow, Russia. The mineralogy of the effusive silicate rocks from the Mosonik volcano, Northern Tanzania Sedova А.М.1, Zaitsev A.N.1,2, J. Spratt2 1 Department of Mineralogy, St. Petersburg State University, Saint-Petersburg, Russia, e-mail: a.sedova@spbu.ru 2Department of Core Research Laboratories, Natural History Museum, London, UK The Mosonik volcano belongs to the Neogene-Resent volcanics of the Natron-Engaruka region of the East African Rift system. It is one of several stratovolcanoes located on the northeastern tip of the Gregory Rift Valley. Mosonik is attributed as having the earliest phase of eruptions in this province (Dawson, 2008) and is dated in the range 3.18-1.28 Ma (Isaac & Curtis, 1974; Dawson, 2008). In 1961, it was mapped by the Tanganyika Geological Survey (Guest et al., 1961), with published data (Paslick et al., 1996) on the composition of minerals from basanites, nephelinites and phonolites. According to the results of this study the compositions of melilite and nephelinite, Zaitsev et al. (2015) have indicated that the Mosonik volcano could be a potential source for the Upper Laetolil Footprint Tuff 7. According to our data the main effusive rocks of Mosonic are various nephelinites and phonolites, quite often they contain xenoliths of plutonic rocks: melteigites, foyaites, ijolites, and rocks of the enclosing stratum (andesites). Carbonatites mostly occur as boulders of various sizes within creek deposits. Among nephelinites there are nephelinites s.s., phonolitic nephelinites, calcite-phonolite nephelinites and melilite nephelinites. Microphenocrysts are represented by nepheline (45-60%), pyroxenes of diopside-hedenbergite solid solution, in some cases with aegirine edging (15-30%), apatite (3-10%) and titanite (3-10%). Calcite content reaches 10% within the calcite varieties of nephelinites; sanidine up to 10% in phonolitic nephelinites, which are strongly altered. Melilite nephelinites are also characterized by the following coposition: melilite (20%), perovskite (5%), sherlomite (3%). In rare cases within the nephelinites there are microphenocrysts of nepheline. Phonolites are represented by the following species: phonolites, sodalite phonolites and calcite phonolites. Phenocrysts are represented by nepheline (40-65%), pyroxenes of the diopside-hedenbergite series, rarely with aegirine edging (10-50%), sanidine (15-40%), Mg-Fe mica (0-5%), titanite (1-10%), and apatite (0-8%). In these rocks a large number of macrophenic crystals of nepheline, pyroxene, and often sanidine are observed. The work is supported by Russian Foundation of Basic Research (grant 18-05-00835) and St. Petersburg State University (Geomodel Resource Center) References Dawson J. B. The Gregory Rift Valley and Neogene-Recent Volcanoes of Northern Tanzania. London. 2008. 112 pp. Guest N. J., James, T. C Pickering R., and Dawson J. B. Angata salei. Geol. Surv. Tanganyika. Quarter degree sheet 39. 1961 Isaac, G. L. & Curtis, G. H. Age of the Acheulian industries from the Peninj Group, Tanzania // Nature. 1974. p.249. Paslick, C., Halliday, A. N., Lange, R. A., James, D. & Dawson, J. B. Indirect crustal contamination: evidence from isotopic and chemical disequilibria in minerals from alkali basalts and nephelinites from northern Tanzania // Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology. Vol. 125. 1996. 277–292. Zaitsev A.N., Spratt J., Sharygin V.V., Wenzel T., Zaitseva O.A., Markl G. Mineralogy of the Laetolil Footprint Tuff: A comparison with possible volcanic sources from the Crater Highlands and Gregory Rift // Journal of African Earth Sciences. Vol. 111. 2015. pp. 214–221.
    • The remedial conservation and support jacketing of the neotype specimen of the dinosaur Massospondylus carinatus

      Graham, M (PeerJ, 2017-08-09)
      The remedial conservation and support jacketing of the neotype specimen of the dinosaur Massospondylus carinatus
    • A unique CO-like micrometeorite hosting an exotic Al-Cu-Fe-bearing assemblage – close affinities with the Khatyrka meteorite

      Suttle, MD; Twegar, K; Nava, J; Spiess, R; Spratt, J; Campanale, F; Folco, L (Springer Science and Business Media LLC, 2019-08-27)
      We report the discovery of a unique micrometeorite, containing an exotic Al-Cu-Fe alloy composed of two intermixed phases: khatyrkite (CuAl2) and stolperite (CuAl) and both containing minor Fe (<1.4 wt%). These phases are dendritic and rapidly co-crystallized at the binary system’s peritectic (~550 °C). The host micrometeorite is an otherwise typical S-type micro-porphyritic cosmic spherule containing relict olivine (Fo76–90, Cr2O3: 0.01–0.56 wt%, MnO: 0.03–0.32 wt% and CaO: 0.09–0.22 wt%) and a cumulate layered texture. These properties suggest the micrometeorite is derived from a carbonaceous chondrite (best matched to a CO chondrite) and entered the atmosphere a high speed (~16 kms−1), implying an origin from a highly eccentric orbit. This particle represents the second independent discovery of naturally occurring intermetallic Al-Cu-Fe alloys and is thus similar to the previously reported Khatyrka meteorite - a CV chondrite containing near-identical alloys and the only known natural quasicrystals. We did not observe quasicrystalline phases in this micrometeorite, likely due to the low amounts of Fe in the alloy, insufficient to stabilize quasicrystals. Our discovery confirms the existence of Al-Cu-Fe intermetallic alloys on chondritic parent bodies. These unusual phases require a currently unexplained formation process, we tentatively suggest this could represent the delivery of exotic interstellar material to the inner solar system via impact.
    • Siidraite, Pb 2 Cu(OH) 2 I 3 , from Broken Hill, New South Wales, Australia: the third halocuprate(I) mineral

      Rumsey, MS; Welch, MD; Kleppe, AK; Spratt, J (E. Schweizerbart’sche Verlagsbuchhandlung, 2017-12-01)
      Siidraite, Pb2Cu(OH)2I3, is a new mineral from the Broken Hill deposit in New South Wales, Australia. It occurs as an extremely rare secondary phase alongside marshite, other lead and copper secondaries and supergene cuprite on a single specimen, BM 84642 preserved in the collection of the Natural History Museum, London. Siidraite is yellow and occurs in crystalline grainy aggregates up to 0.3 mm around relict galena. The mineral is translucent with a vitreous lustre and yellow streak, no cleavages or forms have yet been observed. It is non-fluorescent in mixed-wavelength UV light. The calculated density is 6.505 g cm−3. Siidraite is orthorhombic, space group Fddd, a = 16.7082(9) Å, b = 20.846(1) Å, c = 21.016(1) Å, V = 7320.0(8) Å3 and Z = 32. The empirical formula derived from a combination of electron-microprobe analysis and structure determination is Pb2.06Cu0.89(OH)2I2.97, the ideal formula has (in wt%) 8.01 Cu2O, 50.01 PbO, 42.65 I and 2.02 H2O. The five strongest lines in the calculated X-ray powder diffraction pattern are [(h k l), d obs (Å), I/I max (%)]: [(2 4 6), 2.746, 100], [(4 0 4), 3.270, 81], [(2 6 4), 2.738, 77], [(3 1 5), 3.312, 76], [(3 5 1), 3.296, 69]. The crystal used for structure determination had minor pseudomerohedral twinning on [ 0   1 ‾   1 ] and the structure was refined taking this into account to R 1 = 0.037, wR 2 = 0.052, GooF = 1.016, based upon 1368 unique reflections having I > 2σ(I). The structure of siidraite is a framework comprising an alternation of two structural elements, a cubane-like [Pb4(OH)4]4+ group and a [Cu2I6]4− dimer of edge-sharing CuI4 tetrahedra with non-equivalent Cu. Six halocuprate groups surround each [Pb4(OH)4]4+ nucleus, and each halocuprate group is shared between six adjacent [Pb4(OH)4]4+ groups, five long Pb–I bonds are required to complete the co-ordination of each Pb atom. The resulting Pb(OH)3I5 polyhedra are centred on a tetrahedron of O atoms to form a Pb4(OH)4I16 cluster. Siidraite has a unique composition and structure. It is the third naturally occurring halocuprate(I) after marshite and nantokite. A compositionally similar synthetic compound Pb2Cu2(OH)2I2Br has been described that has cubane and CuI4 groups, but a very different structural topology from that of siidraite. Bideauxite, Pb2Ag(OH)FCl3, which has the [Pb4(OH)4]4+ group, shares some topological features with siidraite.
    • Professional fossil preparators at the British Museum (Natural History), 1843-1990*

      Graham, M; Reichenbach, H (Edinburgh University Press, 2019-10-01)
      Since the inception of the British Museum (Natural History) in 1881 (now the Natural History Museum, London), the collection, development and mounting of fossils for scientific study and public exhibition have been undertaken by fossil preparators. Originally known as masons, because of their rock-working skills, their roles expanded in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, when, at the forefront of the developing science of palaeontology, the Museum was actively obtaining fossil material from the UK and abroad to build the collections. As greater numbers of more impressive specimens were put on public display, these preparators developed new and better methods to recover and transport fossils from the field, and technical improvements, in the form of powered tools, enabled more detailed mechanical preparation to be undertaken. A recurring theme in the history of palaeontological preparation has been that sons often followed in their fathers’ footsteps in earth sciences. William and Thomas Davies, Caleb and Frank Barlow, and Louis and Robert Parsons were all father-and-son geologists and preparators.
    • Alkali-rich replacement zones in evolved NYF pegmatites: metasomatic fluids or immiscible melts?

      Muller, A; Spratt, J; Thomas, R; Williamson, BJ; Seltmann, Reimar (International Mineralogical Association, 2018-08-13)
      IMA2018 Abstract submission Pegmatite mineralogy, geochemistry, classification and origins IMA2018-1337 Alkali-rich replacement zones in evolved NYF pegmatites: metasomatic fluids or immiscible melts? Axel Muller* 1, John Spratt2, Rainer Thomas3, Ben J. Williamson4, Reimar Seltmann2 1Natural History Museum, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway, 2Department of Earth Sciences, Natural History Museum, London, United Kingdom, 3Chemistry and Physics of Earth Materials, German Research Centre for Geoscience GFZ, Potsdam, Germany, 4Camborne School of Mines, University of Exeter, Penryn, United Kingdom What is your preferred presentation method?: Oral or poster presentation : Replacement zones (RZ), which are a common feature of evolved granitic pegmatites, are irregular, commonly alkali-rich zones superimposing, cross-cutting and replacing the primary zonation in almost all consolidated pegmatite bodies. RZ are widely considered to result from late-stage metasomatism even though little is known about the melts and/or fluids involved in their formation. However, the observed textures and mineral paragenesis of RZ cannot be explained by metasomatism in a strict sense. In this study, the nature of the late stage silicate melt forming “cleavelandite” RZ is assessed from textural, mineralogical, chemical and melt inclusion studies of evolved, Proterozoic Niobium-Yttrium-Fluorine (NYF) rare metal pegmatites from Evje–Iveland, southern Norway. These were studied as they are mineralogically simple, compared with RZ in evolved Lithium-Caesium-Tantalum (LCT) pegmatites. Silicate melt inclusions in RZ-forming topaz and “cleavelandite” document high H2O contents of up to18 wt.% of the F-rich silicate melt from which the RZ crystallized. In addition, from mineral compositions (“cleavelandite”, “amazonite”, white mica, garnet, columbite group minerals, topaz, fluorite, and beryl), they must have also been strongly alkaline (Na-dominated) with enrichments in F (at least 4 wt.%), Cs, Rb, Ta, Nb, Mn, Ge, Bi, As, and in some cases also Li compared with host pegmatites. These elements are concentrated in a few RZ-forming minerals resulting in very distinctive mineral-trace element signatures. “Amazonite” is strongly enriched in Cs and Rb and often white mica and beryl in Li and Cs. To acquire these mineral compositions, the overall Li-Cs-Ta-poor Evje-Iveland original pegmatite melt must have undergone extreme internal chemical differentiation resulting in melt/melt immiscibility aiding rheology contrasts and resulting in RZ formation. The resulting RZ-forming H2O-F-rich silicate melt would have shown large differences in viscosity and density, and therefore physical flow/transport properties, to the host pegmatite melt resulting in discordant contacts. The mineralogy and melt inclusion data from the Evje-Iveland pegmatites document a gradient of crystallization temperatures within the investigated pegmatite bodies with highest temperatures at the pegmatite margin (during initial emplacement, ~680°C) and lowest temperatures within the RZ (<500°C). Considering the temperature and pressure conditions of the host rocks gneisses and amphibolites (~650°C, up to 5 kbar) at the time of pegmatite emplacement and the crystallization conditions of the RZ, the Evje- Iveland pegmatites and RZ likely formed over a period of 2.2 million years, assuming an exhumation rate of 1.5 mm per million years and a geothermal gradient of 45°C km-1. Such a long crystallization time contradicts the classical view that pegmatites represent strongly undercooled melts which crystallize relatively fast.
    • The crystal structure of cesbronite, Cu 3 TeO 4 (OH) 4 : a novel sheet tellurate topology

      Missen, OP; Mills, SJ; Welch, MD; Spratt, J; Rumsey, MS; Birch, WD; Brugger, J (International Union of Crystallography, 2018-01-09)
      The crystal structure of cesbronite has been determined using single-crystal X-ray diffraction and supported by electron-microprobe analysis, powder diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Cesbronite is orthorhombic, space group Cmcm, with a = 2.93172 (16), b = 11.8414 (6), c = 8.6047 (4) Å and V = 298.72 (3) Å3. The chemical formula of cesbronite has been revised to CuII3TeVIO4(OH)4 from CuII5(TeIVO3)2(OH)6·2H2O. This change has been accepted by the Commission on New Minerals, Nomenclature and Classification of the International Mineralogical Association, Proposal 17-C. The previously reported oxidation state of tellurium has been shown to be incorrect; the crystal structure, bond valence studies and charge balance clearly show tellurium to be hexavalent. The crystal structure of cesbronite is formed from corrugated sheets of edge-sharing CuO6 and (Cu0.5Te0.5)O6 octahedra. The structure determined here is an average structure that has underlying ordering of Cu and Te at one of the two metal sites, designated as M, which has an occupancy Cu0.5Te0.5. This averaging probably arises from an absence of correlation between adjacent polyhedral sheets, as there are two different hydrogen-bonding configurations linking sheets that are related by a ½a offset. Randomised stacking of these two configurations results in the superposition of Cu and Te and leads to the Cu0.5Te0.5 occupancy of the M site in the average structure. Bond-valence analysis is used to choose the most probable Cu/Te ordering scheme and also to identify protonation sites (OH). The chosen ordering scheme and its associated OH sites are shown to be consistent with the revised chemical formula.
    • Trace-element geochemistry of molybdenite from porphyry Cu deposits of the Birgilda-Tomino ore cluster (South Urals, Russia)

      Plotinskaya, OY; Abramova, VD; Groznova, EO; Tessalina, SG; Seltmann, Reimar; Spratt, J (Cambridge University Press, 2018-05)
      Mineralogical, electron microprobe analysis and laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry data from molybdenite within two porphyry copper deposits (Kalinovskoe and Birgilda) of the Birgilda-Tomino ore cluster (South Urals) are presented.† The results provide evidence that molybdenites from these two sites have similar trace-element chemistry. Most trace elements (Si, Fe, Co, Cu, Zn, Ag, Sb, Te, Pb, Bi, Au, As and Se) form mineral inclusions within molybdenite. The Re contents in molybdenite vary from 8.7 ppm to 1.13 wt.%. The Re distribution within single molybdenite flakes is always extremely heterogeneous. It is argued that a temperature decrease favours the formation of Re-rich molybdenite. The high Re content of molybdenite observed points to a mantle-derived source.
    • Rare earth elements in phoscorites and carbonatites of the Devonian Kola Alkaline Province, Russia: Examples from Kovdor, Khibina, Vuoriyarvi and Turiy Mys complexes

      Zaitsev, AN; Terry Williams, C; Jeffries, T; Strekopytov, S; Moutte, J; Ivashchenkova, OV; Spratt, J; Petrov, SV; Wall, F; Seltmann, Reimar; et al. (Elsevier, 2014-09)
      he Devonian (ca. 385–360 Ma) Kola Alkaline Province includes 22 plutonic ultrabasic–alkaline complexes, some of which also contain carbonatites and rarely phoscorites. The latter are composite silicate–oxide–phosphate–carbonate rocks, occurring in close space-time genetic relations with various carbonatites. Several carbonatites types are recognized at Kola, including abundant calcite carbonatites (early- and late-stage), with subordinate amounts of late-stage dolomite carbonatites, and rarely magnesite, siderite and rhodochrosite carbonatites. In phoscorites and early-stage carbonatites the rare earth elements (REE) are distributed among the major minerals including calcite (up to 490 ppm), apatite (up to 4400 ppm in Kovdor and 3.5 wt.% REE2O3 in Khibina), and dolomite (up to 77 ppm), as well as accessory pyrochlore (up to 9.1 wt.% REE2O3) and zirconolite (up to 17.8 wt.% REE2O3). Late-stage carbonatites, at some localities, are strongly enriched in REE (up to 5.2 wt.% REE2O3 in Khibina) and the REE are major components in diverse major and minor minerals such as burbankite, carbocernaite, Ca- and Ba-fluocarbonates, ancylite and others. The rare earth minerals form two distinct mineral assemblages: primary (crystallized from a melt or carbohydrothermal fluid) and secondary (formed during metasomatic replacement). Stable (C–O) and radiogenic (Sr–Nd) isotopes data indicate that the REE minerals and their host calcite and/or dolomite have crystallized from a melt derived from the same mantle source and are co-genetic.
    • A New Method for the Restoration of Palaeontological Specimens Mounted in Canada balsam

      Allington-Jones, L (Natural Sciences Collections Association (NatSCA ), 2008)
      Many museums contain slides mounted with Canada balsam. If this resin is poorly prepared, it can become crazed. Examples can be found within the British Type Graptolite Collection at the Natural History Museum, London. These are delicate dendroids prepared using the transfer technique. A search of the available literature and communication with museum workers highlighted suggestions for methods to rescue the cracked slides. These methods were tested, and the most suitable method proved to be a double transfer technique utilising carbowax. This technique may be used to rescue any specimen which is mounted in Canada balsam and which possesses an exposed surface. It is particularly important for the conservation of fragile specimens.
    • Mastodon and on and on…a moving story

      Allington-Jones, L (NatSCA, 2018-02-01)
      This is the latest chapter in the history of the mastodon (Mammut americanum (Kerr, 1792)) specimen on display at the Natural History Museum (NHM) in London (UK), and continues from the story told by Lindsay (1991). The specimen was selected to be one of the new exhibits for the Wonder Bays of the refurbished Hintze Hall, at the heart of the Waterhouse building. Residing, until recently, on open display in a different exhibition space, the mastodon required stabilisation and careful dismantling before transportation and reassembly in its new site.
    • Scratchpads 2.0: a Virtual Research Environment supporting scholarly collaboration, communication and data publication in biodiversity science

      Smith, V; Rycroft, S; Brake, I; Scott, B; Baker, E; Livermore, L; Blagoderov, V; Roberts, D (Pensoft, 2011-11-28)
      The Scratchpad Virtual Research Environment (http://scratchpads.eu/) is a flexible system for people to create their own research networks supporting natural history science. Here we describe Version 2 of the system characterised by the move to Drupal 7 as the Scratchpad core development framework and timed to coincide with the fifth year of the project’s operation in late January 2012. The development of Scratchpad 2 reflects a combination of technical enhancements that make the project more sustainable, combined with new features intended to make the system more functional and easier to use. A roadmap outlining strategic plans for development of the Scratchpad project over the next two years concludes this article.
    • The Phoenix: The Role of Conservation Ethics in the Development of St Pancras Railway Station (London, UK)

      Allington-Jones, L (Ubiquity Press Ltd., 2013-09-02)
      St Pancras Railway Station, London (UK), has recently undergone alterations that have variously been described as conservation, restoration, refurbishment and rejuvenation, to become the new terminal for Eurostar. This article aims to evaluate the recent changes and relate them to current conservation ethics. Observations were made on site, derived from research in published literature and were assessed according to principles of conservation. The article concludes that, in the recent developments, conservation ethics have been drawn upon in an inconsistent fashion, and that the best description for the rebirth of the station is ‘recycling’. Investigation of the ‘conservation’ of significant items of national heritage, like St Pancras, is essential for formulating future standards and evaluating our own perceptions and the diversity of possible interpretations of conservation terminology.
    • Deep-sea anthropogenic macrodebris harbours rich and diverse communities of bacteria and archaea

      Woodall, LC; Jungblut, AD; Hopkins, K; Hall, A; Robinson, LF; Gwinnett, C; Paterson, GLJ (PLOS, 2018-11-28)
      The deep sea is the largest biome on earth, and microbes dominate in biomass and abundance. Anthropogenic litter is now almost ubiquitous in this biome, and its deposition creates new habitats and environments, including for microbial assemblages. With the ever increasing accumulation of this debris, it is timely to identify and describe the bacterial and archaeal communities that are able to form biofilms on macrodebris in the deep sea. Using 16S rRNA gene high throughput sequencing, we show for the first time the composition of bacteria and archaea on macrodebris collected from the deep sea. Our data suggest differences in the microbial assemblage composition across litter of different materials including metal, rubber, glass, fabric and plastic. These results imply that anthropogenic macrodebris provide diverse habitats for bacterial and archaeal biofilms and each may harbour distinct microbial communities.
    • SEM-microphotogrammetry, a new take on an old method for generating high-resolution 3D models from SEM images

      Ball, AD; JOB, PA; WALKER, AEL (Wiley, 2017-03-22)
      The method we present here uses a scanning electron microscope programmed via macros to automatically capture dozens of images at suitable angles to generate accurate, detailed three‐dimensional (3D) surface models with micron‐scale resolution. We demonstrate that it is possible to use these Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) images in conjunction with commercially available software originally developed for photogrammetry reconstructions from Digital Single Lens Reflex (DSLR) cameras and to reconstruct 3D models of the specimen. These 3D models can then be exported as polygon meshes and eventually 3D printed. This technique offers the potential to obtain data suitable to reconstruct very tiny features (e.g. diatoms, butterfly scales and mineral fabrics) at nanometre resolution. Ultimately, we foresee this as being a useful tool for better understanding spatial relationships at very high resolution. However, our motivation is also to use it to produce 3D models to be used in public outreach events and exhibitions, especially for the blind or partially sighted.
    • The air-abrasive technique: a re-evaluation of its use in fossil preparation.

      Graham, M; Allington-Jones, L (Coquina Press, 2018-08)
      This paper outlines the history of air-abrasion (also known as airbrasion) as a palaeontological preparation technique and evaluates various powders and their properties. It explores the rationale behind the selection of abrasive powders and presents, for the first time, trench-scatter experiments through Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) photography and three-dimensional (3-D) profiling. This article also offers general practical advice and details the results of an international survey of practising fossil preparators
    • Size effect on the mineralogy and chemistry of Mytilus trossulus shells from the southern Baltic Sea: implications for environmental monitoring

      Piwoni-Piórewicz, A; Kukliński, P; Strekopytov, S; Humphreys-Williams, Emma; Najorka, J; Iglikowska, A (2017-04)