• Honeaite, a new gold-thallium-telluride from the Eastern Goldfields, Yilgarn Craton, Western Australia

      Rice, CM; Welch, MD; Still, JW; Criddle, AJ; Stanley, Christopher (2016-01-24)
      Honeaite, ideal formula Au3TlTe2, is a new mineral from the late Archaean Karonie gold deposit, Eastern Goldfields province, Western Australia. Honeaite is found with native gold, tellurobismuthite, petzite, hessite, calaverite, melonite, mattagamite, frohbergite, altaite, pyrrhotite and molybdenite. These minerals are concentrated in microvughs and microfractures mainly within areas of prehnite alteration of amphibolite. The mineralisation appears to have been deposited under greenschistfacies conditions at lower temperatures than most gold deposits in the Eastern Goldfields. Single-crystal X-ray studies identified the structure of honeaite as orthorhombic, space group Pbcm, and unit cell parameters a = 8.9671(4) Å, b = 8.8758(4) Å, c = 7.8419(5) Å, V = 624.14(6) Å3 (Z = 4). The strongest reflections of the calculated powder X-ray diffraction pattern are [d in Å (I rel)(hkl)]: 2.938(100)(022), 2.905 (39,8)(322, 411), 2.989 (31)(300), 2.833 (23)(310), 1.853 (17)(332). Electron-microprobe analysis (EDS mode) gave (wt%) Au 56.33, Tl 19.68, Te 24.30, total 100.31, leading to an empirical formula (based on 2 Te apfu) of Au3.00Tl1.01Te2.00. Honeaite is black with a metallic lustre and no observed cleavage. The calculated density is 11.18 g/cm3. In reflected plane-polarized light it is slightly bluish grey. Between crossed polars it is weakly anisotropic with dark brown to dark blue rotation tints. Reflectance values in air and in oil are given. Honeaite is named after the late Russell M. Honea (1929–2002).
    • Hydroxyferroroméite, a new secondary weathering mineral from Oms, France

      Mills, S; Christy, A; Rumsey, M; Spratt, J; Bittarello, E; Favreau, G; Ciriotti, M; Berbain, C (2017-04-28)
      Hydroxyferroroméite, ideally (Fe2+ 1.5[]0.5)Sb5+ 2O6(OH), is a new secondary mineral from the Correc d'en Llinassos, Oms, Pyrénées-Orientales Department, France. Hydroxyferroroméite occurs as yellow to yellow-brown powdery boxwork replacements up to about 50μm across after tetrahedrite in a siderite–quartz matrix. No distinct crystals have been observed. The empirical formula (based on 7 (O + OH) per formula unit, pfu) is (Fe2+ 1.07Cu2+ 0.50Zn0.03Sr0.03Ca 0.01[]0.36)Σ2 (Sb5+ 1.88Si0.09Al0.02As0.01)Σ2 O6 ((OH)0.86 O0.14). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to determine the valence states of Sb, Fe and Cu. Hydroxyferroroméite crystallises in the space group Fd3 m with the pyrochlore structure and hence is a new Fe2+ -dominant member of the roméite group of the pyrochlore supergroup. It has the unit-cell parameters: a = 10.25(3) Å, V = 1077(6) Å3 and Z = 8. A model, based on bond-valence theory, for incorporation of the small Fe2+ cation into a displaced variant of the A site of the pyrochlore structure is proposed.
    • Siidraite, Pb 2 Cu(OH) 2 I 3 , from Broken Hill, New South Wales, Australia: the third halocuprate(I) mineral

      Rumsey, MS; Welch, MD; Kleppe, AK; Spratt, J (E. Schweizerbart’sche Verlagsbuchhandlung, 2017-12-01)
      Siidraite, Pb2Cu(OH)2I3, is a new mineral from the Broken Hill deposit in New South Wales, Australia. It occurs as an extremely rare secondary phase alongside marshite, other lead and copper secondaries and supergene cuprite on a single specimen, BM 84642 preserved in the collection of the Natural History Museum, London. Siidraite is yellow and occurs in crystalline grainy aggregates up to 0.3 mm around relict galena. The mineral is translucent with a vitreous lustre and yellow streak, no cleavages or forms have yet been observed. It is non-fluorescent in mixed-wavelength UV light. The calculated density is 6.505 g cm−3. Siidraite is orthorhombic, space group Fddd, a = 16.7082(9) Å, b = 20.846(1) Å, c = 21.016(1) Å, V = 7320.0(8) Å3 and Z = 32. The empirical formula derived from a combination of electron-microprobe analysis and structure determination is Pb2.06Cu0.89(OH)2I2.97, the ideal formula has (in wt%) 8.01 Cu2O, 50.01 PbO, 42.65 I and 2.02 H2O. The five strongest lines in the calculated X-ray powder diffraction pattern are [(h k l), d obs (Å), I/I max (%)]: [(2 4 6), 2.746, 100], [(4 0 4), 3.270, 81], [(2 6 4), 2.738, 77], [(3 1 5), 3.312, 76], [(3 5 1), 3.296, 69]. The crystal used for structure determination had minor pseudomerohedral twinning on [ 0   1 ‾   1 ] and the structure was refined taking this into account to R 1 = 0.037, wR 2 = 0.052, GooF = 1.016, based upon 1368 unique reflections having I > 2σ(I). The structure of siidraite is a framework comprising an alternation of two structural elements, a cubane-like [Pb4(OH)4]4+ group and a [Cu2I6]4− dimer of edge-sharing CuI4 tetrahedra with non-equivalent Cu. Six halocuprate groups surround each [Pb4(OH)4]4+ nucleus, and each halocuprate group is shared between six adjacent [Pb4(OH)4]4+ groups, five long Pb–I bonds are required to complete the co-ordination of each Pb atom. The resulting Pb(OH)3I5 polyhedra are centred on a tetrahedron of O atoms to form a Pb4(OH)4I16 cluster. Siidraite has a unique composition and structure. It is the third naturally occurring halocuprate(I) after marshite and nantokite. A compositionally similar synthetic compound Pb2Cu2(OH)2I2Br has been described that has cubane and CuI4 groups, but a very different structural topology from that of siidraite. Bideauxite, Pb2Ag(OH)FCl3, which has the [Pb4(OH)4]4+ group, shares some topological features with siidraite.