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dc.contributor.authorSherlock, E
dc.contributor.authorNeal, L
dc.contributor.authorGlover, AG
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-11T15:18:55Z
dc.date.available2017-08-11T15:18:55Z
dc.date.issued2014-12-18en_US
dc.date.submitted2017-05-23
dc.identifier.citationSherlock, E, Neal, N & Glover, A., G. 2015. 100 years of deep-sea tubeworms in the collections of the Natural History Museum, London. Journal of Natural Science Collections. 2. pp. 47-53.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10141/622252
dc.description.abstractDespite having being discovered relatively recently, the Siboglinidae family of poly- chaetes have a controversial taxonomic history. They are predominantly deep sea tube- dwelling worms, often referred to simply as ‘tubeworms’ that include the magnificent me- tre-long Riftia pachyptila from hydrothermal vents, the recently discovered ‘bone-eating’ Osedax and a diverse range of other thin, tube-dwelling species. For a long time they were considered to be in a completely separate Phylum, the Pogonophora, but with the discovery of a segmented posterior and then conclusive DNA evidence, they were re- stored to the Phylum Annelida. In this project curation and research teams have com- bined to enhance the Museum’s collection. This has been facilitated through targeted donation requests, comprehensive digitisation, a location move to the rightful taxonomic place and teaming up with global database initiatives to promote the collection.
dc.rightsopenAccessen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.5/
dc.title100 years of deep-sea tubeworms in the collections of the Natural History Museum, Londonen_US
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Natural Science Collectionsen_US
dc.identifier.volume2en_US
dc.identifier.startpage47 - 53en_US
dc.internal.reviewer-noteEditor of NatSCA has confirmed is OK to publish. HCL to do! 2/8/17en
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group/Functional groups
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group/Functional groups/Other Support
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group/Functional groups/Research
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group/Functional groups/Research/LS Research
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group/Life Sciences
dc.embargoNot knownen_US
elements.import.authorSherlock, Een_US
elements.import.authorNeal, Len_US
elements.import.authorGlover, AGen_US
dc.description.nhmNatSCA supports open access publication as part of its mission is to promote and support natural science collections. NatSCA uses the Creative Commons Attribution License (CCAL) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.5/  for all works we publish. Under CCAL authors retain ownership of the copyright for their article, but authors allow anyone to download, reuse, reprint, modify, distribute, and/or copy articles in NatSCA publications, so long as the original authors and source are cited. The attached file is the published version of the article.en
dc.subject.nhmSiboglinidaeen
dc.subject.nhmPolychaetaen
dc.subject.nhmAnnelidaen
dc.subject.nhmPognophoraen
dc.subject.nhmDigitisationen
dc.subject.nhmSystematicsen
dc.subject.nhmCurationen
refterms.dateFOA2019-03-01T09:17:44Z
html.description.abstractDespite having being discovered relatively recently, the Siboglinidae family of poly- chaetes have a controversial taxonomic history. They are predominantly deep sea tube- dwelling worms, often referred to simply as ‘tubeworms’ that include the magnificent me- tre-long Riftia pachyptila from hydrothermal vents, the recently discovered ‘bone-eating’ Osedax and a diverse range of other thin, tube-dwelling species. For a long time they were considered to be in a completely separate Phylum, the Pogonophora, but with the discovery of a segmented posterior and then conclusive DNA evidence, they were re- stored to the Phylum Annelida. In this project curation and research teams have com- bined to enhance the Museum’s collection. This has been facilitated through targeted donation requests, comprehensive digitisation, a location move to the rightful taxonomic place and teaming up with global database initiatives to promote the collection.


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