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dc.contributor.authorGrant, MLen
dc.contributor.authorLavers, JLen
dc.contributor.authorStuckenbrock, Sen
dc.contributor.authorSharp, PBen
dc.contributor.authorBond, ALen
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-07T15:05:55Z
dc.date.available2018-11-07T15:05:55Z
dc.date.issued2018-10-11
dc.date.submitted2018-10-25
dc.identifier.citationMegan L. Grant, Jennifer L. Lavers, Silke Stuckenbrock, Paul B. Sharp, Alexander L. Bond, The use of anthropogenic marine debris as a nesting material by brown boobies (Sula leucogaster), Marine Pollution Bulletin, Volume 137, 2018, Pages 96-103, ISSN 0025-326X, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.marpolbul.2018.10.016. (http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0025326X18307173)en
dc.identifier.issn0025-326Xen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.marpolbul.2018.10.016en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10141/622420
dc.description.abstractMarine debris is pervasive worldwide, and affects biota negatively. We compared the characteristics of debris incorporated within brown booby (Sula leucogaster) nests throughout their pantropical distribution by assessing the type, colour and mass of debris items within nests and in beach transects at 18 sites, to determine if nests are indicators of the amount of debris in local marine environments. Debris was present in 14.4% of nests surveyed, with the proportion of nests with debris varying among sites (range: 0–100%). There was minimal overlap between the type or colour of debris found in nests and on adjacent beaches at individual sites. This suggests that brown boobies do not select debris uniformly across their distribution. We propose that the nests of brown boobies can be used as a sentinel of marine debris pollution of their local environment.
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.rightsembargoedAccessen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.titleThe use of anthropogenic marine debris as a nesting material by brown boobies (Sula leucogaster)en_US
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.journalMarine Pollution Bulletinen_US
dc.identifier.volume137en_US
dc.identifier.startpage96 - 103en_US
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group/Functional groups
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group/Functional groups/Collections
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group/Functional groups/Collections/LS Collections
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group/Life Sciences
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group/Life Sciences/Vertebrates
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group/Life Sciences/Vertebrates/Vertebrates – Collections
dc.embargoNot knownen_US
elements.import.authorGrant, MLen_US
elements.import.authorLavers, JLen_US
elements.import.authorStuckenbrock, Sen_US
elements.import.authorSharp, PBen_US
elements.import.authorBond, ALen_US
dc.description.nhm© 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. The attached document is the author(’s’) final accepted/submitted version of the journal article. You are advised to consult the publisher’s version if you wish to cite from it.en
dc.subject.nhmEnvironmental indicatoren
dc.subject.nhmLitteren
dc.subject.nhmNesting ecologyen
dc.subject.nhmPantropical oceansen
dc.subject.nhmPlastic pollutionen
dc.subject.nhmSeabirdsen
refterms.dateFOA2018-12-13T14:50:32Z
html.description.abstractMarine debris is pervasive worldwide, and affects biota negatively. We compared the characteristics of debris incorporated within brown booby (Sula leucogaster) nests throughout their pantropical distribution by assessing the type, colour and mass of debris items within nests and in beach transects at 18 sites, to determine if nests are indicators of the amount of debris in local marine environments. Debris was present in 14.4% of nests surveyed, with the proportion of nests with debris varying among sites (range: 0–100%). There was minimal overlap between the type or colour of debris found in nests and on adjacent beaches at individual sites. This suggests that brown boobies do not select debris uniformly across their distribution. We propose that the nests of brown boobies can be used as a sentinel of marine debris pollution of their local environment.


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