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dc.contributor.authorGlover, AG
dc.contributor.authorWiklund, H
dc.contributor.authorChen, C
dc.contributor.authorDahlgren, TG
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-05T15:30:26Z
dc.date.available2019-03-05T15:30:26Z
dc.date.issued2018-11-27
dc.date.submitted2018-12-14
dc.identifier.issn2050-084X
dc.identifier.doi10.7554/eLife.41319
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10141/622435
dc.description.abstractEnsuring that the wealth of resources contained in our oceans are managed and developed in a sustainable manner is a priority for the emerging 'blue economy'. However, modern ecosystem-based management approaches do not translate well to regions where we know almost nothing about the individual species found in the ecosystem. Here, we propose a new taxon-focused approach to deep-sea conservation that includes regulatory oversight to set targets for the delivery of taxonomic data. For example, a five-year plan to deliver taxonomic and genomic knowledge on a thousand species in regions of the ocean earmarked for industrial activity is an achievable target. High-throughput, integrative taxonomy can, therefore, provide the data that is needed to monitor various ecosystem services (such as the natural history, connectivity, value and function of species) and to help break the regulatory deadlock of high-seas conservation.en_US
dc.relation.urihttps://elifesciences.org/articles/41319en_US
dc.rightsopenAccessen_US
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.titleManaging a sustainable deep-sea 'blue economy' requires knowledge of what actually lives thereen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.identifier.journalELIFEen_US
dc.identifier.volume7en_US
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group/Functional groups
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group/Functional groups/Research
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group/Functional groups/Research/LS Research
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group/Life Sciences
dc.embargoNot knownen_US
elements.import.authorGlover, AGen_US
elements.import.authorWiklund, Hen_US
elements.import.authorChen, Cen_US
elements.import.authorDahlgren, TGen_US
dc.description.nhm© 2018, Glover et al. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited. The attached file is the published version of this article.en_US
dc.subject.nhmFeature articleen_US
dc.subject.nhmEcologyen_US
dc.subject.nhmEvolutionary biologyen_US
dc.subject.nhmDeep seaen_US
dc.subject.nhmTaxonomyen_US
dc.subject.nhmBiodiversityen_US
dc.subject.nhmSustainable developmenten_US
dc.subject.nhmBlue economyen_US
dc.subject.nhmPoint of viewen_US
refterms.dateFOA2019-03-05T15:30:26Z


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