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dc.contributor.authorBrewer, P
dc.contributor.authorArcher, M
dc.contributor.authorHand, S
dc.contributor.authorPrice, GJ
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-05T13:05:43Z
dc.date.available2019-06-05T13:05:43Z
dc.date.issued2018-08
dc.date.submitted2019-05-05
dc.identifier.citationBrewer, Philippa, Archer, Michael, Hand, Suzanne, and Price, Gilbert J. 2018. A new species of Miocene wombat (Marsupialia, Vombatiformes) from Riversleigh, Queensland, Australia, and implications for the evolutionary history of the Vombatidae. Palaeontologia Electronica 21.2.27A 1-48. https://doi.org/10.26879/870 palaeo-electronica.org/content/2018/2245-new-rhizophascolonus-speciesen_US
dc.identifier.issn1935-3952
dc.identifier.doi10.26879/870
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10141/622528
dc.description.abstractA new species of wombat, Rhizophascolonus ngangaba sp. nov., is described from Miocene deposits at Riversleigh along with additional specimens of Rhizophascolonus crowcrofti, and some maxillary and mandibular fragments attributable to Rhizophascolonus. A phylogenetic analysis indicates that Rhizophascolonus is the next most plesiomorphic wombat after Nimbavombatus boodjamullensis. Morphological characters common to Nimbavombatus and Rhizophascolonus suggest that adaptations to high rates of tooth wear in wombats had their origin in the late Oligocene, presumably in response to climatic cooling and its effects on the vegetation. A period of climatic amelioration in the early Miocene may have led to diversification of wombats and/or to an expansion of their range into rainforest habitats. Although wombats form a significant component of Australia’s open-forest and woodland habitats from the early Pliocene to Holocene, they appear to have been rare in all palaeoenvironments prior to this.en_US
dc.publisherPalaeontologia Electronicaen_US
dc.rightsopenAccessen_US
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/
dc.subjectRhizophascolonus ngangaba; new species; Riversleigh; wombat; phylogenyen_US
dc.titleA new species of Miocene wombat (Marsupialia, Vombatiformes) from Riversleigh, Queensland, Australia, and implications for the evolutionary history of the Vombatidaeen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1094-8074
dc.identifier.journalPALAEONTOLOGIA ELECTRONICAen_US
dc.identifier.volume21en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group/Earth Sciences
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group/Earth Sciences/Vertebrates and Anthropology Palaeobiology
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group/Functional groups
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group/Functional groups/Collections
dc.embargoNot knownen_US
elements.import.authorBrewer, Pen_US
elements.import.authorArcher, Men_US
elements.import.authorHand, Sen_US
elements.import.authorPrice, GJen_US
dc.description.nhmCopyright: August 2018 Palaeontological Association. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0), which permits users to copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format, provided it is not used for commercial purposes and the original author and source are credited, with indications if any changes are made. creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/ The attached file is the published version of the article.en_US
dc.subject.nhmRhizophascolonus ngangabaen_US
dc.subject.nhmnew speciesen_US
dc.subject.nhmRiversleighen_US
dc.subject.nhmwombaten_US
dc.subject.nhmphylogenyen_US
refterms.dateFOA2019-06-05T13:05:43Z


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