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dc.contributor.authorCrees, JJ
dc.contributor.authorTurvey, ST
dc.contributor.authorFreeman, R
dc.contributor.authorCarbone, C
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-24T13:39:32Z
dc.date.available2019-06-24T13:39:32Z
dc.date.issued2019-06-08
dc.date.submitted2019-06-24
dc.identifier.citationCrees, J. J., Turvey, S. T., Freeman, R. and Carbone, C. (2019), Mammalian tolerance to humans is predicted by body mass: evidence from long‐term archives. Ecology. Accepted Author Manuscript. doi:10.1002/ecy.2783en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/ecy.2783
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10141/622538
dc.description.abstractHumans are implicated as a major driver of species extinctions from the Late Pleistocene to the present. However, our predictive understanding of human-caused extinction remains poor due to the restricted temporal and spatial scales at which this process is typically assessed, and the risks of bias due to "extinction filters" resulting from a poor understanding of past species declines. We develop a novel continent-wide dataset containing country-level last-occurrence records for 30 European terrestrial mammals across the Holocene (c.11,500 years to present), an epoch of relative climatic stability that captures major transitions in human demography. We analyze regional extirpations against a high-resolution database of human population density (HPD) estimates to identify species-specific tolerances to changing HPD through the Holocene. Mammalian thresholds to HPD scale strongly with body mass, with larger-bodied mammals experiencing regional population losses at lower HPDs than smaller-bodied mammals. Our analysis enables us to identify levels of tolerance to HPD for different species, and therefore has wide applicability for determining biotic vulnerability to human impacts. This ecological pattern is confirmed across wide spatiotemporal scales, providing insights into the dynamics of prehistoric extinctions and the modern biodiversity crisis, and emphasizing the role of long-term archives in understanding human-caused biodiversity loss. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.publisherEcological Society of Americaen_US
dc.rightsclosedAccessen_US
dc.subjectHolocene; extinction filter; extinction risk; historical ecology; human population density; mammalsen_US
dc.titleMammalian tolerance to humans is predicted by body mass: evidence from long-term archives.en_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1939-9170
dc.identifier.journalEcologyen_US
dc.conference.locationUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.startpagee02783 - ?en_US
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group/Earth Sciences
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group/Earth Sciences/Vertebrates and Anthropology Palaeobiology
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group/Functional groups
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group/Functional groups/Research
dc.embargoNot knownen_US
elements.import.authorCrees, JJen_US
elements.import.authorTurvey, STen_US
elements.import.authorFreeman, Ren_US
elements.import.authorCarbone, Cen_US
dc.description.nhm© 2019 Ecological Society of America. All rights reserved. This article has been accepted for publication and undergone full peer review but has not been through the copyediting, typesetting, pagination and proofreading process, which may lead to differences between this version and the Version of Record. Please cite this article as doi: 10.1002/ecy.2783en_US
dc.subject.nhmmammalsen_US
dc.subject.nhmextinction filteren_US
dc.subject.nhmextinction risken_US
dc.subject.nhmhistorical ecologyen_US
dc.subject.nhmHoloceneen_US
dc.subject.nhmhuman population densityen_US
refterms.dateFOA2019-06-24T13:39:33Z


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