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dc.contributor.authorWilkinson, JJ
dc.contributor.authorSimmons, SF
dc.contributor.authorStoffell, B
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-15T10:51:14Z
dc.date.available2020-04-15T10:51:14Z
dc.date.issued2013-06-24
dc.date.submitted2020-04-07
dc.identifier.citationWilkinson, J., Simmons, S. & Stoffell, B. How metalliferous brines line Mexican epithermal veins with silver. Sci Rep 3, 2057 (2013). https://doi.org/10.1038/srep02057en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/srep02057
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10141/622696
dc.description.abstractWe determined the composition of ~30-m.y.-old solutions extracted from fluid inclusions in one of the world's largest and richest silver ore deposits at Fresnillo, Mexico. Silver concentrations average 14 ppm and have a maximum of 27 ppm. The highest silver, lead and zinc concentrations correlate with salinity, consistent with transport by chloro-complexes and confirming the importance of brines in ore formation. The temporal distribution of these fluids within the veins suggests mineralization occurred episodically when they were injected into a fracture system dominated by low salinity, metal-poor fluids. Mass balance shows that a modest volume of brine, most likely of magmatic origin, is sufficient to supply the metal found in large Mexican silver deposits. The results suggest that ancient epithermal ore-forming events may involve fluid packets not captured in modern geothermal sampling and that giant ore deposits can form rapidly from small volumes of metal-rich fluid.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Science and Business Media LLCen_US
dc.rightsopenAccessen_US
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/
dc.titleHow metalliferous brines line Mexican epithermal veins with silveren_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn2045-2322
dc.identifier.journalScientific Reportsen_US
dc.identifier.volume3en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group/Earth Sciences
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group/Earth Sciences/Economic and Environmental Earth Sciences
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group/Functional groups
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group/Functional groups/Research
dc.embargoNot knownen_US
elements.import.authorWilkinson, JJen_US
elements.import.authorSimmons, SFen_US
elements.import.authorStoffell, Ben_US
dc.description.nhmThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/. The attached file is the published pdf.en_US
dc.subject.nhmGeochemistryen_US
dc.subject.nhmGeologyen_US
dc.subject.nhmMineralogyen_US
dc.subject.nhmPetrologyen_US
dc.subject.nhmMexicoen_US
refterms.dateFOA2020-04-15T10:51:15Z


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