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dc.contributor.authorLacruz, RS
dc.contributor.authorBromage, TG
dc.contributor.authorO’Higgins, P
dc.contributor.authorArsuaga, J-L
dc.contributor.authorStringer, C
dc.contributor.authorGodinho, RM
dc.contributor.authorWarshaw, J
dc.contributor.authorMartínez, I
dc.contributor.authorGracia-Tellez, A
dc.contributor.authorde Castro, JMB
dc.contributor.authorCarbonell, E
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-01T14:38:35Z
dc.date.available2020-05-01T14:38:35Z
dc.date.issued2015-12-07
dc.date.submitted2016-07-20
dc.identifier.citationLacruz, R., Bromage, T., O’Higgins, P. et al. Ontogeny of the maxilla in Neanderthals and their ancestors. Nat Commun 6, 8996 (2015).en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/ncomms9996
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10141/622726
dc.description.abstractNeanderthals had large and projecting (prognathic) faces similar to those of their putative ancestors from Sima de los Huesos (SH) and different from the retracted modern human face. When such differences arose during development and the morphogenetic modifications involved are unknown. We show that maxillary growth remodelling (bone formation and resorption) of the Devil’s Tower (Gibraltar 2) and La Quina 18 Neanderthals and four SH hominins, all sub-adults, show extensive bone deposition, whereas in modern humans extensive osteoclastic bone resorption is found in the same regions. This morphogenetic difference is evident by ∼5 years of age. Modern human faces are distinct from those of the Neanderthal and SH fossils in part because their postnatal growth processes differ markedly. The growth remodelling identified in these fossil hominins is shared with Australopithecus and early Homo but not with modern humans suggesting that the modern human face is developmentally derived.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Science and Business Media LLCen_US
dc.rightsopenAccessen_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.titleOntogeny of the maxilla in Neanderthals and their ancestorsen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn2041-1723
dc.identifier.journalNature Communicationsen_US
dc.identifier.volume6en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group/Earth Sciences
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group/Earth Sciences/Vertebrates and Anthropology Palaeobiology
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group/Functional groups
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group/Functional groups/Other Support
dc.embargoNot knownen_US
elements.import.authorLacruz, RSen_US
elements.import.authorBromage, TGen_US
elements.import.authorO’Higgins, Pen_US
elements.import.authorArsuaga, J-Len_US
elements.import.authorStringer, Cen_US
elements.import.authorGodinho, RMen_US
elements.import.authorWarshaw, Jen_US
elements.import.authorMartínez, Ien_US
elements.import.authorGracia-Tellez, Aen_US
elements.import.authorde Castro, JMBen_US
elements.import.authorCarbonell, Een_US
dc.description.nhmThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material.en_US
dc.subject.nhmOntogenyen_US
dc.subject.nhmNeanderthalsen_US
dc.subject.nhmAustralopithecusen_US
dc.subject.nhmHomoen_US
refterms.dateFOA2020-05-01T14:38:35Z


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