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dc.contributor.authorLaffoley, D
dc.contributor.authorBaxter, JM
dc.contributor.authorAmon, Diva
dc.contributor.authorCurrie, DEJ
dc.contributor.authorDowns, CA
dc.contributor.authorHall‐Spencer, JM
dc.contributor.authorHarden‐Davies, H
dc.contributor.authorPage, R
dc.contributor.authorReid, CP
dc.contributor.authorRoberts, CM
dc.contributor.authorRogers, A
dc.contributor.authorThiele, T
dc.contributor.authorSheppard, CRC
dc.contributor.authorSumaila, RU
dc.contributor.authorWoodall, LC
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-14T14:57:44Z
dc.date.available2020-09-14T14:57:44Z
dc.date.issued2019-07-23
dc.date.submitted2020-09-11
dc.identifier.citationLaffoley, D, Baxter, JM, Amon, DJ, et al. Eight urgent, fundamental and simultaneous steps needed to restore ocean health, and the consequences for humanity and the planet of inaction or delay. Aquatic Conserv: Mar Freshw Ecosyst. 2020; 30: 194– 208.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1052-7613
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/aqc.3182
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10141/622837
dc.description.abstractThe ocean crisis is urgent and central to human wellbeing and life on Earth; past and current activities are damaging the planet's main life support system for future generations. We are witnessing an increase in ocean heat, disturbance, acidification, bio‐invasions and nutrients, and reducing oxygen levels. Several of these act like ratchets: once detrimental or negative changes have occurred, they may lock in place and may not be reversible, especially at gross ecological and ocean process scales. Each change may represent a loss to humanity of resources, ecosystem function, oxygen production and species. The longer we pursue unsuitable actions, the more we close the path to recovery and better ocean health and greater benefits for humanity in the future. We stand at a critical juncture and have identified eight priority issues that need to be addressed in unison to help avert a potential ecological disaster in the global ocean. They form a purposely ambitious agenda for global governance and are aimed at informing decision‐makers at a high level. They should also be of interest to the general public. Of all the themes, the highest priority is to rigorously address global warming and limit surface temperature rise to 1.5°C by 2100, as warming is the pre‐eminent factor driving change in the ocean. The other themes are establishing a robust and comprehensive High Seas Treaty, enforcing existing standards for Marine Protected Areas and expanding their coverage, especially in terms of high levels of protection, adopting a precautionary pause on deep‐sea mining, ending overfishing and destructive fishing practices, radically reducing marine pollution, putting in place a financing mechanism for ocean management and protection, and lastly, scaling up science/data gathering and facilitating data sharing. By implementing all eight measures in unison, as a coordinated strategy, we can build resilience to climate change, help sustain fisheries productivity, particularly for low‐income countries dependent on fisheries, protect coasts (e.g. via soft‐engineering/habitat‐based approaches), promote mitigation (e.g. carbon storage) and enable improved adaptation to rapid global change.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherWileyen_US
dc.relation.urihttp://10.0.3.234/aqc.3182en_US
dc.rightsopenAccessen_US
dc.titleEight urgent, fundamental and simultaneous steps needed to restore ocean health, and the consequences for humanity and the planet of inaction or delayen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1099-0755
dc.identifier.journalAquatic Conservation: Marine and Freshwater Ecosystemsen_US
dc.identifier.volume30en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.startpage194 - 208en_US
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group/Functional groups
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group/Functional groups/Other Support
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group/Life Sciences
dc.embargoNot knownen_US
elements.import.authorLaffoley, Den_US
elements.import.authorBaxter, JMen_US
elements.import.authorAmon, DJen_US
elements.import.authorCurrie, DEJen_US
elements.import.authorDowns, CAen_US
elements.import.authorHall‐Spencer, JMen_US
elements.import.authorHarden‐Davies, Hen_US
elements.import.authorPage, Ren_US
elements.import.authorReid, CPen_US
elements.import.authorRoberts, CMen_US
elements.import.authorRogers, Aen_US
elements.import.authorThiele, Ten_US
elements.import.authorSheppard, CRCen_US
elements.import.authorSumaila, RUen_US
elements.import.authorWoodall, LCen_US
dc.description.nhmThe attached document is the author(’s’) final accepted/submitted version of the journal article. You are advised to consult the publisher’s version if you wish to cite from it.en_US
dc.subject.nhmclimate changeen_US
dc.subject.nhmdeep‐sea miningen_US
dc.subject.nhmfinanceen_US
dc.subject.nhmfisheriesen_US
dc.subject.nhmfishingen_US
dc.subject.nhmhigh seasen_US
dc.subject.nhmMPAsen_US
dc.subject.nhmoceanen_US
dc.subject.nhmpollutionen_US
dc.subject.nhmprotectionen_US
dc.subject.nhmscientific researchen_US
dc.subject.nhmsustainabilityen_US
refterms.dateFOA2020-09-14T14:57:44Z


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