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dc.contributor.authorPrice, BW
dc.contributor.authorBriscoe, AG
dc.contributor.authorMisra, Raju
dc.contributor.authorBroad, G
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-15T12:58:15Z
dc.date.available2020-10-15T12:58:15Z
dc.date.issued2020-10
dc.date.submitted2020-10-15
dc.identifier.citationPrice, Briscoe, Misra and Broad (2020) DEFRA Centre of Excellence for DNA Methods: Evaluation of DNA barcode libraries used in the UK and developing an action plan to fill priority gaps. Natural England Joint Publication JP035.en_US
dc.identifier.isbn978-1-78354-671-8
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10141/622857
dc.identifier.urihttp://publications.naturalengland.org.uk/publication/4670286621573120
dc.identifier.urihttps://zenodo.org/record/3965809#.X4hH4dD0nct
dc.description.abstractThere are approximately 76,000 eukaryote species recognised in the UK, and while we know some of them in great detail, the majority of these species are poorly known, and hundreds of new species are discovered each year. DNA barcoding uses a short, standardised segment of an organism’s genome for identification by comparison to a reference library; however, the UK lags behind several countries in Europe and North America in that we lack trusted, reliable and openly accessible reference sequences for key UK taxa. This report is the first step in rectifying this by engaging diverse stakeholders to facilitate collaboration and coordination; providing robust stakeholder-based and independent assessment of the current state of reference libraries available for all known UK taxa; and prioritising key taxa. A survey was developed and shared with the UK research and end user community, receiving 80 responses from a wide range of stakeholders and covering the focal taxa / assemblages and habitats; the DNA reference libraries in use, their quality assurance and perceived coverage. A formal gap analysis of the public DNA data in major DNA reference libraries highlighted that an estimated 52% of UK species have publicly available DNA data of some sort; however, coverage in gene specific reference libraries varies greatly (eg 2 – 52%), as does the associated quality assurance. Priority taxa highlighted by end users had coverage in reference libraries ranging from almost complete, in the case of known invasive non-native species, to significant coverage (71%) for taxa with conservation designations. However, these data also vary by kingdom and reference library, as does the associated quality assurance. If taking a strict requirement of DNA data provided by UK specimens and held in UK repositories, for robust QC and QA, then the proportion of UK species with public DNA data in reference libraries falls to less than 4% in the largest reference library assessed (BOLD). While standard genes for DNA-based identification have essentially been established, more work is required to establish the priority taxa required for regulatory delivery in contrast to taxa that are surveyed in a non-regulatory framework. Several barriers to the development of barcode libraries were highlighted, the most relevant being sustained large scale funding, expertise, capacity, laboratory skills and equipment, quality control and assurance, collecting logistics (eg permits and access) and communication. Significant opportunities identified include a large network of interested experts, several organisations with significant delivery capabilities, current large-scale projects and funding opportunities, emerging technologies and the economy of scale for DNA sequencing. Following a stakeholder workshop, we have outlined a concise action plan to provide reliable, open access reference sequences, linked to open access vouchers, identified by known experts, to facilitate UK academic and regulatory aims.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherNatural Englanden_US
dc.relation.urihttp://www.gov.uk/natural-englanden_US
dc.relation.urihttp://publications.naturalengland.org.uk/publication/4670286621573120en_US
dc.rightsopenAccessen_US
dc.rights.urihttp://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/doc/open-government-licence/version/3/
dc.titleEvaluation of DNA barcode libraries used in the UK and developing an action plan to fill priority gapsen_US
dc.typeTechnical Reporten_US
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group/Functional groups
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group/Functional groups/Other Support
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group/Life Sciences
dc.embargoNot knownen_US
elements.import.authorPrice, Ben_US
elements.import.authorBriscoe, Aen_US
elements.import.authorMisra, Ren_US
elements.import.authorBroad, Gen_US
dc.description.nhmThis report is published by Natural England under the Open Government Licence - OGLv3.0 for public sector information. You are encouraged to use, and reuse, information subject to certain conditions. For details of the licence visit Copyright. Natural England photographs are only available for non-commercial purposes. If any other information such as maps or data cannot be used commercially this will be made clear within the report. ISBN 978-1-78354-671-8 © Natural England and other parties 2020 © Trustees of the Natural History Museum, Londonen_US
dc.subject.nhmDNA barcodingen_US
dc.subject.nhmDNA reference librariesen_US
dc.subject.nhmUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.subject.nhmSurveysen_US
refterms.dateFOA2020-10-15T12:58:16Z


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