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dc.contributor.authorFeng, Shaohong
dc.contributor.authorFang, Qi
dc.contributor.authorBarnett, Ross
dc.contributor.authorLi, Cai
dc.contributor.authorHan, Sojung
dc.contributor.authorKuhlwilm, Martin
dc.contributor.authorZhou, Long
dc.contributor.authorPan, Hailin
dc.contributor.authorDeng, Yuan
dc.contributor.authorChen, Guangji
dc.contributor.authorGamauf, Anita
dc.contributor.authorWoog, Friederike
dc.contributor.authorPrys-Jones, Robert
dc.contributor.authorMarques-Bonet, Tomas
dc.contributor.authorGilbert, M Thomas P
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Guojie
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-19T09:24:56Z
dc.date.available2020-11-19T09:24:56Z
dc.date.issued2019-01-10
dc.date.submitted2020-11-19
dc.identifier.citationShaohong Feng, Qi Fang, Ross Barnett, Cai Li, Sojung Han, Martin Kuhlwilm, Long Zhou, Hailin Pan, Yuan Deng, Guangji Chen, Anita Gamauf, Friederike Woog, Robert Prys-Jones, Tomas Marques-Bonet, M. Thomas P. Gilbert, Guojie Zhang, The Genomic Footprints of the Fall and Recovery of the Crested Ibis,Current Biology,Volume 29, Issue 2,2019,Pages 340-349.e7, ISSN 0960-9822, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2018.12.008.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0960-9822
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.cub.2018.12.008
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10141/622871
dc.description.abstractHuman-induced environmental change and habitat fragmentation pose major threats to biodiversity and require active conservation efforts to mitigate their consequences. Genetic rescue through translocation and the introduction of variation into imperiled populations has been argued as a powerful means to preserve, or even increase, the genetic diversity and evolutionary potential of endangered species [1-4]. However, factors such as outbreeding depression [5, 6] and a reduction in available genetic diversity render the success of such approaches uncertain. An improved evaluation of the consequence of genetic restoration requires knowledge of temporal changes to genetic diversity before and after the advent of management programs. To provide such information, a growing number of studies have included small numbers of genomic loci extracted from historic and even ancient specimens [7, 8]. We extend this approach to its natural conclusion, by characterizing the complete genomic sequences of modern and historic population samples of the crested ibis (Nipponia nippon), an endangered bird that is perhaps the most successful example of how conservation effort has brought a species back from the brink of extinction. Though its once tiny population has today recovered to >2,000 individuals [9], this process was accompanied by almost half of ancestral loss of genetic variation and high deleterious mutation load. We furthermore show how genetic drift coupled to inbreeding following the population bottleneck has largely purged the ancient polymorphisms from the current population. In conclusion, we demonstrate the unique promise of exploiting genomic information held within museum samples for conservation and ecological research.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BVen_US
dc.rightsopenAccessen_US
dc.rights.uri
dc.titleThe Genomic Footprints of the Fall and Recovery of the Crested Ibisen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1879-0445
dc.identifier.journalCurrent Biologyen_US
dc.date.updated2020-11-19T08:53:28Z
dc.identifier.volume29en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.startpage340-349.e7en_US
dc.description.nhm© 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an open access article available to all published under a Creative Commons Attribution – NonCommercial – NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0). The attached file is the published pdf.en_US
dc.subject.nhmconservation genomicsen_US
dc.subject.nhmPopulation Genomicsen_US
dc.subject.nhmendangered speciesen_US
dc.subject.nhmextinctionen_US
dc.subject.nhmdemographyen_US
dc.subject.nhminbreedingen_US
dc.subject.nhmmutation loaden_US
dc.subject.nhmgenetic recoveryen_US
dc.subject.nhmancient genomicsen_US
dc.subject.nhmornithologyen_US
refterms.dateFOA2020-11-19T09:24:58Z


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