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dc.contributor.authorSpiekman, Stephan NF
dc.contributor.authorNeenan, James M
dc.contributor.authorFraser, Nicholas C
dc.contributor.authorFernandez, Vincent
dc.contributor.authorRieppel, Olivier
dc.contributor.authorNosotti, Stefania
dc.contributor.authorScheyer, Torsten M
dc.date.accessioned2021-03-01T14:37:14Z
dc.date.available2021-03-01T14:37:14Z
dc.date.issued2020-08-06
dc.date.submitted2021-02-22
dc.identifier.citationSpiekman, S. N. F., et al. (2020). "Aquatic Habits and Niche Partitioning in the Extraordinarily Long-Necked Triassic Reptile <em>Tanystropheus</em>." Current Biology 30(19): 3889-3895.e3882. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2020.07.025en_US
dc.identifier.issn0960-9822
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.cub.2020.07.025
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10141/622898
dc.description.abstractTanystropheus longobardicus is one of the most remarkable and iconic Triassic reptiles. Mainly known from the Middle Triassic conservation Lagerstätte of Monte San Giorgio on the Swiss-Italian border, it is characterized by an extraordinarily long and stiffened neck that is almost three times the length of the trunk, despite being composed of only 13 hyper-elongate cervical vertebrae [1-8]. Its paleobiology remains contentious, with both aquatic and terrestrial lifestyles having been proposed [1, 9-12]. Among the Tanystropheus specimens, a small morphotype bearing tricuspid teeth and a large morphotype bearing single-cusped teeth can be recognized, historically considered as juveniles and adults of the same species [4]. Using high-resolution synchrotron radiation microtomography (SRμCT), we three-dimensionally reconstruct a virtually complete but disarticulated skull of the large morphotype, including its endocast and inner ear, to reveal its morphology for the first time. The skull is specialized toward hunting in an aquatic environment, indicated by the placement of the nares on the top of the snout and a "fish-trap"-type dentition. The SRμCT data and limb bone paleohistology reveal that the large morphotype represents a separate species (Tanystropheus hydroides sp. nov.). Skeletochronology of the small morphotype specimens indicates that they are skeletally mature despite their small size, thus representing adult individuals of Tanystropheus longobardicus. The co-occurrence of these two species of disparate size ranges and dentitions provides strong evidence for niche partitioning, highlighting the surprising versatility of the Tanystropheus bauplan and the complexity of Middle Triassic nearshore ecosystems.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BVen_US
dc.rightsclosedAccessen_US
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.titleAquatic Habits and Niche Partitioning in the Extraordinarily Long-Necked Triassic Reptile Tanystropheusen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1879-0445
dc.identifier.journalCurrent Biologyen_US
dc.date.updated2021-02-22T16:11:30Z
dc.identifier.volume30en_US
dc.identifier.issue19en_US
dc.identifier.startpage3889-3895.e2en_US
dc.description.nhm© 2020 Elsevier Inc. The attached document is the author(’s’) final accepted/submitted version of the journal article. You are advised to consult the publisher’s version if you wish to cite from it.en_US
dc.subject.nhmTanystropheusen_US
dc.subject.nhmaquatic adaptationsen_US
dc.subject.nhmniche partitioningen_US
dc.subject.nhmTriassicen_US
dc.subject.nhmArchosauromorphaen_US
dc.subject.nhmsynchrotron microtomographyen_US
dc.subject.nhmcranial reconstructionen_US
dc.subject.nhmbone histologyen_US


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