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dc.contributor.authorSalge, T
dc.contributor.authorTagle, Roald
dc.contributor.authorSchmitt, Ralf-Thomas
dc.contributor.authorHecht, Lutz
dc.contributor.editorWolf Uwe, Reimold
dc.contributor.editorChris, Koeberl
dc.date.accessioned2021-08-20T13:34:45Z
dc.date.available2021-08-20T13:34:45Z
dc.date.issued2021-06-30
dc.identifier.citationTobias Salge, Roald Tagle, Ralf-Thomas Schmitt, Lutz Hecht, 2021. "Petrographic and chemical studies of the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary sequence at El Guayal, Tabasco, Mexico: Implications for ejecta plume evolution from the Chicxulub impact crater", Large Meteorite Impacts and Planetary Evolution VI, Wolf Uwe Reimold, Christian Koeberlen_US
dc.identifier.isbn9780813725505
dc.identifier.doi10.1130/2021.2550(08)
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10141/622919
dc.description.abstractA combined petrographic and chemical study of ejecta particles from the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary sequence of El Guayal, Tabasco, Mexico (520 km SW of Chicxulub crater), was carried out to assess their formation conditions and genetic relation during the impact process. The reaction of silicate ejecta particles with hot volatiles during atmospheric transport may have induced alteration processes, e.g., silicification and cementation, observed in the ejecta deposits. The various microstructures of calcite ejecta particles are interpreted to reflect different thermal histories at postshock conditions. Spherulitic calcite particles may represent carbonate melts that were quenched during ejection. A recrystallized microstructure may indicate short, intense thermal stress. Various aggregates document particle-particle interactions and intermixing of components from lower silicate and upper sedimentary target lithologies. Aggregates of recrystallized calcite with silicate melt indicate the consolidation of a hot suevitic component with sediments at ≳750 °C. Accretionary lapilli formed in a turbulent, steam-condensing environment at ~100 °C by aggregation of solid, ash-sized particles. Concentric zones with smaller grain sizes of accreted particles indicate a recurring exchange with a hotter environment. Our results suggest that during partial ejecta plume collapse, hot silicate components were mixed with the fine fraction of local surface-derived sediments, the latter of which were displaced by the preceding ejecta curtain. These processes sustained a hot, gas-driven, lateral basal transport that was accompanied by a turbulent plume at a higher level. The exothermic back-reaction of CaO from decomposed carbonates and sulfates with CO2 to form CaCO3 may have been responsible for a prolonged release of thermal energy at a late stage of plume evolution.en_US
dc.publisherGeological Society of Americaen_US
dc.rightsopenAccessen_US
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.titlePetrographic and chemical studies of the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary sequence at El Guayal, Tabasco, Mexico: Implications for ejecta plume evolution from the Chicxulub impact crateren_US
dc.typeBook chapteren_US
dc.date.updated2021-07-13T15:06:18Z
dc.identifier.volume550en_US
dc.identifier.startpage207en_US
elements.import.authorSalge, Tobias
elements.import.authorTagle, Roald
elements.import.authorSchmitt, Ralf-Thomas
elements.import.authorHecht, Lutz
dc.description.nhmThis is an open access article, available to all readers online, published under a creative commons licensing (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/). The attached file is the published version of the article.en_US


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