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dc.contributor.authorGibson, Brandt M
dc.contributor.authorFurbish, David J
dc.contributor.authorRahman, Imran
dc.contributor.authorSchmeeckle, Mark W
dc.contributor.authorLaflamme, Marc
dc.contributor.authorDarroch, Simon AF
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-06T15:19:37Z
dc.date.available2021-09-06T15:19:37Z
dc.date.issued2021-02
dc.identifier.citationGibson, B.M., Furbish, D.J., Rahman, I.A., Schmeeckle, M.W., Laflamme, M. and Darroch, S.A. (2021), Ancient life and moving fluids. Biol Rev, 96: 129-152. https://doi.org/10.1111/brv.12649en_US
dc.identifier.issn1464-7931
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/brv.12649
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10141/622923
dc.description.abstractOver 3.7 billion years of Earth history, life has evolved complex adaptations to help navigate and interact with the fluid environment. Consequently, fluid dynamics has become a powerful tool for studying ancient fossils, providing insights into the palaeobiology and palaeoecology of extinct organisms from across the tree of life. In recent years, this approach has been extended to the Ediacara biota, an enigmatic assemblage of Neoproterozoic soft-bodied organisms that represent the first major radiation of macroscopic eukaryotes. Reconstructing the ways in which Ediacaran organisms interacted with the fluids provides new insights into how these organisms fed, moved, and interacted within communities. Here, we provide an in-depth review of fluid physics aimed at palaeobiologists, in which we dispel misconceptions related to the Reynolds number and associated flow conditions, and specify the governing equations of fluid dynamics. We then review recent advances in Ediacaran palaeobiology resulting from the application of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). We provide a worked example and account of best practice in CFD analyses of fossils, including the first large eddy simulation (LES) experiment performed on extinct organisms. Lastly, we identify key questions, barriers, and emerging techniques in fluid dynamics, which will not only allow us to understand the earliest animal ecosystems better, but will also help to develop new palaeobiological tools for studying ancient life.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherWileyen_US
dc.rightsopenAccessen_US
dc.source.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.titleAncient life and moving fluidsen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1469-185X
dc.identifier.journalBiological Reviewsen_US
dc.date.updated2021-09-02T13:43:32Z
dc.identifier.volume96en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.startpage129en_US
elements.import.authorGibson, Brandt M
elements.import.authorFurbish, David J
elements.import.authorRahman, Imran A
elements.import.authorSchmeeckle, Mark W
elements.import.authorLaflamme, Marc
elements.import.authorDarroch, Simon AF
dc.description.nhmThis is an open access article, available to all readers online, published under a creative commons licensing (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).en_US
dc.subject.nhmEdiacara biotaen_US
dc.subject.nhmcomputational fluid dynamicsen_US
dc.subject.nhmlarge eddy simulationen_US
dc.subject.nhmfluid dynamicsen_US
dc.subject.nhmsuspension feedingen_US
dc.subject.nhmosmotrophyen_US


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