Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorGrant, Megan L
dc.contributor.authorLavers, Jennifer L
dc.contributor.authorHutton, Ian
dc.contributor.authorBond, AL
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-29T10:45:21Z
dc.date.available2021-09-29T10:45:21Z
dc.date.issued2021-02-16
dc.identifier.citationMegan L. Grant, Jennifer L. Lavers, Ian Hutton, Alexander L. Bond, Seabird breeding islands as sinks for marine plastic debris, Environmental Pollution, Volume 276, 2021, 116734, ISSN 0269-7491, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envpol.2021.116734.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0269-7491
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.envpol.2021.116734
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10141/622932
dc.description.abstractSeabirds are apex predators in the marine environment and well-known ecosystem engineers, capable of changing their terrestrial habitats by introducing marine-derived nutrients via deposition of guano and other allochthonous inputs. However, with the health of the world's oceans under threat due to anthropogenic pressures such as organic, inorganic, and physical pollutants, seabirds are depositing these same pollutants wherever they come to land. Using data from 2018 to 2020, we quantify how the Flesh-footed Shearwater (Ardenna carneipes) has inadvertently introduced physical pollutants to their colonies on Lord Howe Island, a UNESCO World Heritage site in the Tasman Sea and their largest breeding colony, through a mix of regurgitated pellet (bolus) deposition and carcasses containing plastic debris. The density of plastics within the shearwater colonies ranged between 1.32 and 3.66 pieces/m<sup>2</sup> (mean ± SE: 2.18 ± 0.32), and a total of 688,480 (95% CI: 582,409-800,877) pieces are deposited on the island each year. Our research demonstrates that seabirds are a transfer mechanism for marine-derived plastics, reintroducing items back into the terrestrial environment, thus making seabird colonies a sink for plastic debris. This phenomenon is likely occurring in seabird colonies across the globe and will increase in severity as global plastic production and marine plastic pollution accelerates without adequate mitigation strategies.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BVen_US
dc.rightsopenAccessen_US
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/
dc.titleSeabird breeding islands as sinks for marine plastic debrisen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1873-6424
dc.identifier.journalEnvironmental Pollutionen_US
dc.date.updated2021-09-08T13:25:30Z
dc.identifier.volume276en_US
dc.identifier.startpage116734en_US
elements.import.authorGrant, Megan L
elements.import.authorLavers, Jennifer L
elements.import.authorHutton, Ian
elements.import.authorBond, Alexander L
dc.description.nhmCopyright © 2021, The Authors. This document is the author’s final accepted version of the journal article. You are advised to consult the published version if you wish to cite from it.en_US
dc.subject.nhmArdennaen_US
dc.subject.nhmFlesh-footed Shearwateren_US
dc.subject.nhmlitteren_US
dc.subject.nhmpollutionen_US
dc.subject.nhmvectoren_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Publisher version
Thumbnail
Name:
Grant et al. 2020_Manuscript_R ...
Embargo:
2023-02-16
Size:
997.6Kb
Format:
PDF
Description:
Revised Manuscript

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

openAccess
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as openAccess