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dc.contributor.authorLi, Xuankun
dc.contributor.authorHamilton, Chris A
dc.contributor.authorSt Laurent, Ryan
dc.contributor.authorBallesteros-Mejia, Liliana
dc.contributor.authorMarkee, Amanda
dc.contributor.authorHAXAIRE, Jean
dc.contributor.authorROUGERIE, Rodolphe
dc.contributor.authorKitching, I
dc.contributor.authorKawahara, Akito Y
dc.date.accessioned2022-02-11T11:40:21Z
dc.date.available2022-02-11T11:40:21Z
dc.date.issued2022-02-09
dc.date.submitted2021-11-08
dc.identifier.citationLi Xuankun, Hamilton Chris A., St Laurent Ryan, Ballesteros-Mejia Liliana, Markee Amanda, Haxaire Jean, Rougerie Rodolphe, Kitching Ian J. and Kawahara Akito Y. 2022A diversification relay race from Caribbean-Mesoamerica to the Andes: historical biogeography of Xylophanes hawkmothsProc. R. Soc. B.2892021243520212435 http://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2021.2435en_US
dc.identifier.issn0962-8452
dc.identifier.doi10.1098/rspb.2021.2435
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10141/622966
dc.description.abstractThe regions of the Andes and Caribbean-Mesoamerica are both hypothesized to be the cradle for many Neotropical lineages, but few studies have fully investigated the dynamics and interactions between Neotropical bioregions. The New World hawkmoth genus Xylophanes is the most taxonomically diverse genus in the Sphingidae, with the highest endemism and richness in the Andes and Caribbean-Mesoamerica. We integrated phylogenomic and DNA barcode data and generated the first time-calibrated tree for this genus, covering 93.8% of the species diversity. We used event-based likelihood ancestral area estimation and biogeographic stochastic mapping to examine the speciation and dispersal dynamics of Xylophanes across bioregions. We also used trait-dependent diversification models to compare speciation and extinction rates of lineages associated with different bioregions. Our results indicate that Xylophanes originated in Caribbean-Mesoamerica in the Late Miocene, and immediately diverged into five major clades. The current species diversity and distribution of Xylophanes can be explained by two consecutive phases. In the first phase, the highest Xylophanes speciation and emigration rates occurred in the Caribbean-Mesoamerica, and the highest immigration rates occurred in the Andes, whereas in the second phase the highest immigration rates were found in Amazonia, and the Andes had the highest speciation and emigration rates.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe Royal Societyen_US
dc.rightsopenAccessen_US
dc.titleA diversification relay race from Caribbean-Mesoamerica to the Andes: historical biogeography of Xylophanes hawkmothsen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1471-2954
dc.identifier.journalProceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciencesen_US
dc.date.updated2022-02-09T09:55:07Z
dc.identifier.volume289en_US
dc.identifier.issue1968en_US
elements.import.authorLi, Xuankun
elements.import.authorHamilton, Chris A
elements.import.authorSt Laurent, Ryan
elements.import.authorBallesteros-Mejia, Liliana
elements.import.authorMarkee, Amanda
elements.import.authorHaxaire, Jean
elements.import.authorRougerie, Rodolphe
elements.import.authorKitching, Ian J
elements.import.authorKawahara, Akito Y
dc.description.nhmCopyright © 2022, The Authors. This document is the author’s final accepted version of the journal article. You are advised to consult the published version if you wish to cite from it.en_US
dc.subject.nhmneotropicalen_US
dc.subject.nhmsphingidaeen_US
dc.subject.nhmDNA barcodeen_US
dc.subject.nhmphylogenomicen_US
dc.subject.nhmbiogeographyen_US
refterms.dateFOA2022-02-11T11:40:22Z


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