Assessing the feasibility of interrupting the transmission of soil-transmitted helminths through mass drug administration: The DeWorm3 cluster randomized trial protocol.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10141/622323
Title:
Assessing the feasibility of interrupting the transmission of soil-transmitted helminths through mass drug administration: The DeWorm3 cluster randomized trial protocol.
Authors:
Ásbjörnsdóttir, KH; Ajjampur, SSR; Anderson, RM; Bailey, R; Gardiner, I; Halliday, KE; Ibikounle, M; Kalua, K; Kang, G; Littlewood, DTJ; Luty, AJF; Means, AR; Oswald, W; Pullan, RL; Sarkar, R; Schär, F; Szpiro, A; Truscott, JE; Werkman, M; Yard, E; Walson, JL ( 0000-0003-4836-720X ) ; DeWorm3 Trials Team
Abstract:
Current control strategies for soil-transmitted helminths (STH) emphasize morbidity control through mass drug administration (MDA) targeting preschool- and school-age children, women of childbearing age and adults in certain high-risk occupations such as agricultural laborers or miners. This strategy is effective at reducing morbidity in those treated but, without massive economic development, it is unlikely it will interrupt transmission. MDA will therefore need to continue indefinitely to maintain benefit. Mathematical models suggest that transmission interruption may be achievable through MDA alone, provided that all age groups are targeted with high coverage. The DeWorm3 Project will test the feasibility of interrupting STH transmission using biannual MDA targeting all age groups. Study sites (population ≥80,000) have been identified in Benin, Malawi and India. Each site will be divided into 40 clusters, to be randomized 1:1 to three years of twice-annual community-wide MDA or standard-of-care MDA, typically annual school-based deworming. Community-wide MDA will be delivered door-to-door, while standard-of-care MDA will be delivered according to national guidelines. The primary outcome is transmission interruption of the STH species present at each site, defined as weighted cluster-level prevalence ≤2% by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), 24 months after the final round of MDA. Secondary outcomes include the endline prevalence of STH, overall and by species, and the endline prevalence of STH among children under five as an indicator of incident infections. Secondary analyses will identify cluster-level factors associated with transmission interruption. Prevalence will be assessed using qPCR of stool samples collected from a random sample of cluster residents at baseline, six months after the final round of MDA and 24 months post-MDA. A smaller number of individuals in each cluster will be followed with annual sampling to monitor trends in prevalence and reinfection throughout the trial. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT03014167.
Citation:
Ásbjörnsdóttir KH, Ajjampur SSR, Anderson RM, Bailey R, Gardiner I, Halliday KE, et al. (2018) Assessing the feasibility of interrupting the transmission of soil-transmitted helminths through mass drug administration: The DeWorm3 cluster randomized trial protocol. PLoS Negl Trop Dis 12(1): e0006166. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0006166
Journal:
PLoS Negl Trop Dis
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10141/622323
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pntd.0006166
Submitted date:
2018-02-06
Type:
Journal Article
Item Description:
The file attached is the Published/publisher’s pdf version of the article.; © 2018 Ásbjörnsdóttir et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Subject Terms:
helminths; mass drug administration; soil-transmitted helminths ;
EISSN:
1935-2735
Appears in Collections:
Life sciences

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorÁsbjörnsdóttir, KHen
dc.contributor.authorAjjampur, SSRen
dc.contributor.authorAnderson, RMen
dc.contributor.authorBailey, Ren
dc.contributor.authorGardiner, Ien
dc.contributor.authorHalliday, KEen
dc.contributor.authorIbikounle, Men
dc.contributor.authorKalua, Ken
dc.contributor.authorKang, Gen
dc.contributor.authorLittlewood, DTJen
dc.contributor.authorLuty, AJFen
dc.contributor.authorMeans, ARen
dc.contributor.authorOswald, Wen
dc.contributor.authorPullan, RLen
dc.contributor.authorSarkar, Ren
dc.contributor.authorSchär, Fen
dc.contributor.authorSzpiro, Aen
dc.contributor.authorTruscott, JEen
dc.contributor.authorWerkman, Men
dc.contributor.authorYard, Een
dc.contributor.authorWalson, JLen
dc.contributor.authorDeWorm3 Trials Teamen
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-13T12:51:51Z-
dc.date.available2018-02-13T12:51:51Z-
dc.date.submitted2018-02-06-
dc.identifier.citationÁsbjörnsdóttir KH, Ajjampur SSR, Anderson RM, Bailey R, Gardiner I, Halliday KE, et al. (2018) Assessing the feasibility of interrupting the transmission of soil-transmitted helminths through mass drug administration: The DeWorm3 cluster randomized trial protocol. PLoS Negl Trop Dis 12(1): e0006166. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0006166en
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pntd.0006166en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10141/622323-
dc.descriptionDeWorm3 collectionen_US
dc.description.abstractCurrent control strategies for soil-transmitted helminths (STH) emphasize morbidity control through mass drug administration (MDA) targeting preschool- and school-age children, women of childbearing age and adults in certain high-risk occupations such as agricultural laborers or miners. This strategy is effective at reducing morbidity in those treated but, without massive economic development, it is unlikely it will interrupt transmission. MDA will therefore need to continue indefinitely to maintain benefit. Mathematical models suggest that transmission interruption may be achievable through MDA alone, provided that all age groups are targeted with high coverage. The DeWorm3 Project will test the feasibility of interrupting STH transmission using biannual MDA targeting all age groups. Study sites (population ≥80,000) have been identified in Benin, Malawi and India. Each site will be divided into 40 clusters, to be randomized 1:1 to three years of twice-annual community-wide MDA or standard-of-care MDA, typically annual school-based deworming. Community-wide MDA will be delivered door-to-door, while standard-of-care MDA will be delivered according to national guidelines. The primary outcome is transmission interruption of the STH species present at each site, defined as weighted cluster-level prevalence ≤2% by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), 24 months after the final round of MDA. Secondary outcomes include the endline prevalence of STH, overall and by species, and the endline prevalence of STH among children under five as an indicator of incident infections. Secondary analyses will identify cluster-level factors associated with transmission interruption. Prevalence will be assessed using qPCR of stool samples collected from a random sample of cluster residents at baseline, six months after the final round of MDA and 24 months post-MDA. A smaller number of individuals in each cluster will be followed with annual sampling to monitor trends in prevalence and reinfection throughout the trial. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT03014167.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.rightsopenAccessen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subjectAnthelmintics; Benin; Clinical Protocols; Clinical Trials as Topic; Disease Transmission, Infectious; Feces; Helminthiasis; Humans; India; Malawi; Mass Drug Administration; Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction; Treatment Outcomeen_US
dc.titleAssessing the feasibility of interrupting the transmission of soil-transmitted helminths through mass drug administration: The DeWorm3 cluster randomized trial protocol.en_US
dc.typeJournal Article-
dc.identifier.eissn1935-2735en_US
dc.identifier.journalPLoS Negl Trop Disen_US
dc.conference.locationUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.volume12en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.startpagee0006166 - ?en_US
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum-
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Access control-
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Access control/Manage LS-
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group-
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group/Functional groups-
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group/Functional groups/Research-
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group/Functional groups/Research/LS Research-
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group/Initiatives-
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group/Initiatives/Natural Resources and Hazards-
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group/Life Sciences-
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group/Life Sciences/LS Department Operations Team-
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group/Life Sciences/Parasites and Vectors-
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group/Life Sciences/Parasites and Vectors/Parasites and Vectors - Research-
dc.embargoNot knownen_US
elements.import.authorÁsbjörnsdóttir, KHen_US
elements.import.authorAjjampur, SSRen_US
elements.import.authorAnderson, RMen_US
elements.import.authorBailey, Ren_US
elements.import.authorGardiner, Ien_US
elements.import.authorHalliday, KEen_US
elements.import.authorIbikounle, Men_US
elements.import.authorKalua, Ken_US
elements.import.authorKang, Gen_US
elements.import.authorLittlewood, DTJen_US
elements.import.authorLuty, AJFen_US
elements.import.authorMeans, ARen_US
elements.import.authorOswald, Wen_US
elements.import.authorPullan, RLen_US
elements.import.authorSarkar, Ren_US
elements.import.authorSchär, Fen_US
elements.import.authorSzpiro, Aen_US
elements.import.authorTruscott, JEen_US
elements.import.authorWerkman, Men_US
elements.import.authorYard, Een_US
elements.import.authorWalson, JLen_US
elements.import.authorDeWorm3 Trials Teamen_US
dc.description.nhmThe file attached is the Published/publisher’s pdf version of the article.en
dc.description.nhm© 2018 Ásbjörnsdóttir et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.-
dc.subject.nhmhelminths; mass drug administration; soil-transmitted helminths ;-
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