Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10141/622328
Title:
A mycorrhizal revolution.
Authors:
Hoysted, GA; Kowal, J; Jacob, A; Rimington, WR; Duckett, JG; Pressel, S; Orchard, S; Ryan, MH; Field, KJ; Bidartondo, MI
Abstract:
It has long been postulated that symbiotic fungi facilitated plant migrations onto land through enhancing the scavenging of mineral nutrients and exchanging these for photosynthetically fixed organic carbon. Today, land plant-fungal symbioses are both widespread and diverse. Recent discoveries show that a variety of potential fungal associates were likely available to the earliest land plants, and that these early partnerships were probably affected by changing atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Here, we evaluate current hypotheses and knowledge gaps regarding early plant-fungal partnerships in the context of newly discovered fungal mutualists of early and more recently evolved land plants and the rapidly changing views on the roles of plant-fungal symbioses in the evolution and ecology of the terrestrial biosphere.
Citation:
Grace A Hoysted, Jill Kowal, Alison Jacob, William R Rimington, Jeffrey G Duckett, Silvia Pressel, Suzanne Orchard, Megan H Ryan, Katie J Field, Martin I Bidartondo, A mycorrhizal revolution, Current Opinion in Plant Biology, Volume 44, 2018, Pages 1-6, ISSN 1369-5266, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pbi.2017.12.004
Journal:
Curr Opin Plant Biol
Issue date:
28-Dec-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10141/622328
DOI:
10.1016/j.pbi.2017.12.004
Submitted date:
2018-01-08
Type:
Journal Article
Item Description:
© 2017 Published by Elsevier Ltd. This review comes from a themed issue on Biotic interactions, edited by Sebastian Schornack and Caroline Gutjahr. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pbi.2017.12.004
Subject Terms:
plant–fungal symbioses; plant–fungal partnerships; fungal mutualists
EISSN:
1879-0356
Appears in Collections:
Life sciences

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHoysted, GAen
dc.contributor.authorKowal, Jen
dc.contributor.authorJacob, Aen
dc.contributor.authorRimington, WRen
dc.contributor.authorDuckett, JGen
dc.contributor.authorPressel, Sen
dc.contributor.authorOrchard, Sen
dc.contributor.authorRyan, MHen
dc.contributor.authorField, KJen
dc.contributor.authorBidartondo, MIen
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-21T15:43:04Z-
dc.date.available2018-02-21T15:43:04Z-
dc.date.issued2017-12-28en_US
dc.date.submitted2018-01-08-
dc.identifier.citationGrace A Hoysted, Jill Kowal, Alison Jacob, William R Rimington, Jeffrey G Duckett, Silvia Pressel, Suzanne Orchard, Megan H Ryan, Katie J Field, Martin I Bidartondo, A mycorrhizal revolution, Current Opinion in Plant Biology, Volume 44, 2018, Pages 1-6, ISSN 1369-5266, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pbi.2017.12.004en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.pbi.2017.12.004en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10141/622328-
dc.description.abstractIt has long been postulated that symbiotic fungi facilitated plant migrations onto land through enhancing the scavenging of mineral nutrients and exchanging these for photosynthetically fixed organic carbon. Today, land plant-fungal symbioses are both widespread and diverse. Recent discoveries show that a variety of potential fungal associates were likely available to the earliest land plants, and that these early partnerships were probably affected by changing atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Here, we evaluate current hypotheses and knowledge gaps regarding early plant-fungal partnerships in the context of newly discovered fungal mutualists of early and more recently evolved land plants and the rapidly changing views on the roles of plant-fungal symbioses in the evolution and ecology of the terrestrial biosphere.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.rightsopenAccessen
dc.titleA mycorrhizal revolution.en_US
dc.typeJournal Article-
dc.identifier.eissn1879-0356en_US
dc.identifier.journalCurr Opin Plant Biolen_US
dc.conference.locationEnglanden_US
dc.identifier.volume44en_US
dc.identifier.startpage1 - 6en_US
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum-
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group-
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group/Functional groups-
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group/Functional groups/Research-
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group/Functional groups/Research/LS Research-
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group/Life Sciences-
dc.embargoNot knownen_US
elements.import.authorHoysted, GAen_US
elements.import.authorKowal, Jen_US
elements.import.authorJacob, Aen_US
elements.import.authorRimington, WRen_US
elements.import.authorDuckett, JGen_US
elements.import.authorPressel, Sen_US
elements.import.authorOrchard, Sen_US
elements.import.authorRyan, MHen_US
elements.import.authorField, KJen_US
elements.import.authorBidartondo, MIen_US
dc.description.nhm© 2017 Published by Elsevier Ltd. This review comes from a themed issue on Biotic interactions, edited by Sebastian Schornack and Caroline Gutjahr. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pbi.2017.12.004en
dc.subject.nhmplant–fungal symbioses; plant–fungal partnerships; fungal mutualists-
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