The Clacton Spear: the last one hundred years

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10141/622351
Title:
The Clacton Spear: the last one hundred years
Authors:
Allington-Jones, L ( 0000-0002-7890-0207 )
Abstract:
In 1911 an eminent amateur prehistorian pulled the broken end of a pointed wooden shaft from Palaeolithic-age sediments at a seaside town in Essex. This artefact, still the earliest worked wood to be discovered in the world, became known as the Clacton Spear. Over the past 100 years it has variously been interpreted as a projectile weapon, a stave, a digging stick, a snow probe, a lance, a game stake and a prod to ward off rival scavengers. These perspectives have followed academic fashions, as the popular views of early hominins have altered. Since discovery the Clacton spear has also been replicated twice, has undergone physical transformations due to preservation treatments, and has featured in two public exhibitions. Within this article the changing context of the spear, its parallels, and all previous conservation treatments and their impacts are assessed.
Citation:
Lu Allington-Jones (2015) The Clacton Spear: The Last One Hundred Years, Archaeological Journal, 172:2, 273-296, DOI: 10.1080/00665983.2015.1008839
Publisher:
Royal Archaeological Institute
Journal:
The Archaeological Journal
Issue date:
2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10141/622351
DOI:
DOI: 10.1080/00665983.2015.1008839
Submitted date:
2018-04-19
Type:
Journal Article
Item Description:
© 2015 Royal Archaeological Institute. This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in The Archaeological Journal on 3rd March 2015, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi.org/10.1080/00665983.2015.1008839.The attached document is the author(’s’) final accepted/submitted version of the journal article. You are advised to consult the publisher’s version if you wish to cite from it.
Subject Terms:
Archaeological artefacts; Conservation treatments
Appears in Collections:
Core research labs and consulting

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAllington-Jones, Len
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-26T15:18:10Z-
dc.date.available2018-04-26T15:18:10Z-
dc.date.issued2015en_US
dc.date.submitted2018-04-19-
dc.identifier.citationLu Allington-Jones (2015) The Clacton Spear: The Last One Hundred Years, Archaeological Journal, 172:2, 273-296, DOI: 10.1080/00665983.2015.1008839en
dc.identifier.doiDOI: 10.1080/00665983.2015.1008839-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10141/622351-
dc.description.abstractIn 1911 an eminent amateur prehistorian pulled the broken end of a pointed wooden shaft from Palaeolithic-age sediments at a seaside town in Essex. This artefact, still the earliest worked wood to be discovered in the world, became known as the Clacton Spear. Over the past 100 years it has variously been interpreted as a projectile weapon, a stave, a digging stick, a snow probe, a lance, a game stake and a prod to ward off rival scavengers. These perspectives have followed academic fashions, as the popular views of early hominins have altered. Since discovery the Clacton spear has also been replicated twice, has undergone physical transformations due to preservation treatments, and has featured in two public exhibitions. Within this article the changing context of the spear, its parallels, and all previous conservation treatments and their impacts are assessed.en_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.publisherRoyal Archaeological Instituteen_US
dc.rightsrestrictedAccessen
dc.titleThe Clacton Spear: the last one hundred yearsen_US
dc.typeJournal Article-
dc.identifier.journalThe Archaeological Journalen_US
dc.identifier.volume172en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.startpage273 - 296en_US
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum-
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group-
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group/Core Research Laboratories-
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group/Core Research Laboratories/Conservation Centre-
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group/Functional groups-
pubs.organisational-group/Natural History Museum/Science Group/Functional groups/Facilities Support-
dc.embargoNot knownen_US
elements.import.authorAllington-Jones, Len_US
dc.description.nhm© 2015 Royal Archaeological Institute. This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in The Archaeological Journal on 3rd March 2015, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi.org/10.1080/00665983.2015.1008839.The attached document is the author(’s’) final accepted/submitted version of the journal article. You are advised to consult the publisher’s version if you wish to cite from it.en
dc.subject.nhmArchaeological artefactsen
dc.subject.nhmConservation treatmentsen
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